Benjamin N. Lawrance is a professor of international studies, history, and anthropology at the Rochester Institute of Technology and author of Amistad’s Orphans: An Atlantic Story of Children, Slavery, and Smuggling.

Marriage by Force?

Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa

Edited by Annie Bunting, Benjamin N. Lawrance, and Richard L. Roberts
Foreword by Doris Buss
Afterword by Emily S. Burrill

Despite international human rights decrees condemning it, marriage by force persists to this day. In this volume, the editors bring together legal scholars, anthropologists, historians, and development workers to explore the range of forced marriage practices in sub-Saharan Africa. The result is a masterful presentation of new perspectives on the practice.

African Asylum at a Crossroads

Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights

Edited by Iris Berger, Tricia Redeker Hepner, Benjamin N. Lawrance, Joanna T. Tague, and Meredith Terretta
Foreword by Penelope Andrews
Afterword by Fallou Ngom

African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights examines the emerging trend of requests for expert opinions in asylum hearings or refugee status determinations. This is the first book to explore the role of court-based expertise in relation to African asylum cases and the first to establish a rigorous analytical framework for interpreting the effects of this new reliance on expert testimony.

Trafficking in Slavery’s Wake

Law and the Experience of Women and Children in Africa

Edited by Benjamin N. Lawrance and Richard L. Roberts

Women and children have been bartered, pawned, bought, and sold within and beyond Africa for longer than records have existed. This important collection examines the ways trafficking in women and children has changed from the aftermath of the “end of slavery” in Africa from the late nineteenth century to the present. The formal abolition of the slave trade and slavery did not end the demand for servile women and children.


In Essentials, Unity
An Economic History of the Grange Movement
The Patrons of Husbandry—or the Grange—is the longest-lived US agricultural society and, since its founding shortly after the Civil War, has had immeasurable influence on social change as enacted by ordinary Americans. The Grange sought to relieve the struggles of small farmers by encouraging collaboration.


Writing an Icon
Celebrity Culture and the Invention of Anaïs Nin
Anaïs Nin, the diarist, novelist, and provocateur, occupied a singular space in twentieth-century culture, not only as a literary figure and voice of female sexual liberation but as a celebrity and symbol of shifting social mores in postwar America.


Penumbra
Poems
Penumbra—Michael Shewmaker’s debut collection—explores the half-shadows of a world torn between faith and doubt.


The Secret of the Hardy Boys
Leslie McFarlane and the Stratemeyer Syndicate
The author of the Hardy Boys Mysteries was, as millions of readers know, Franklin W. Dixon. Except there never was a Franklin W. Dixon. He was the creation of Edward Stratemeyer, the savvy founder of a children's book empire that also published the Tom Swift, Bobbsey Twins, and Nancy Drew series.


The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney
The Politics and Jurisprudence of a Northern Democrat from the Age of Jackson to the Gilded Age
In The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney, David M. Gold works with the public record to reveal the contours of the life and work of one of Ohio’s most intriguing legal figures.