Cherryl Walker

Cherryl Walker is a professor and the head of the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at the University of Stellenbosch. She was the Regional Land Claims Commissioner in KwaZulu–Natal from 1995 to 2000. She is the author of Women and Resistance in South Africa.

Listed in: Legal History · African Studies · History · Sociology · Law

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Land, Memory, Reconstruction, and Justice · Perspectives on Land Claims in South Africa
By Cherryl Walker, Anna Bohlin, Ruth Hall, and Thembela Kepe

Land is a significant and controversial topic in South Africa. Addressing the land claims of those dispossessed in the past has proved to be a demanding, multidimensional process. In many respects the land restitution program that was launched as part of the county’s transition to democracy in 1994 has failed to meet expectations, with ordinary citizens, policymakers, and analysts questioning not only its progress but also its outcomes and parameters.

“An outstanding and timely collection, Land, Memory, Reconstruction, and Justice is the most comprehensive treatment of land restitution in South Africa. It brings together a wealth of thematic and case study material from across the country and provides a rounded view of the multiple meanings of land restitution in postapartheid South Africa.”

Ben Cousins, Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS), University of the Western Cape




Landmarked · Land Claims and Land Restitution in South Africa
By Cherryl Walker

The year 2008 is the deadline set by President Mbeki for the finalization of all land claims by people who were dispossessed under the apartheid and previous white governments. Although most experts agree this is an impossible deadline, it does provide a significant political moment for reflection on the ANC government’s program of land restitution since the end of apartheid.

“Interested outsiders have often reflected on why South Africa’s complex land reform programme failed to meet the high expectations of the early 1990s. Landmarked provides by far and away the most insightful explanation for this. It is a profound, subtle and nuanced study—and because of that might well irritate those, on both left and right, who prefer to remain in their blinkered comfort zones.”

African Affairs