D. M. Thomas

D.M. Thomas is a novelist, poet, and critic, and also one of the preeminent translators of Russian poetry. He lives in England.

Listed in: Poetry · Women Poets · Literary Studies




Way of All the Earth contains selected poems written by Anna Akhmatova, one of Russia’s greatest poets whose works embody the complexities of her era. Intricately observed and unwavering in their emotional immediacy, these strikingly modern poems represent one of the twentieth century’s most powerful voices.

“These are among the best, the most authoritative, of … translations from the Russian, and are from one of the most powerful of the twentieth century Russian poets.”

Financial Time




With this edition of Requiem and Poem without a Hero, Swallow Press presents two of Anna Akhmatova's best-known works, ones that represent the poet at full maturity, and that most trenchantly process the trauma she and others experienced living under Stalin's regime. Akhmatova began the three-decade process of writing Requiem in 1935 after the arrests of her son, Lev Gumilev, and her third husband.

“Translations of the ‘two greatest achievements’ of Akhmatova’s maturity.… A decided addition to any library.”

Choice




Anna Akhmatova (1889–1966) was part of that magnificent and tragic generation of Russian artists which came to first maturity before 1917, and which then had to come to terms with official discouragement and often persecution. You Will Hear Thunder brings together for the first time all D.M. Thomas’s translations of her poems.

“D.M. Thomas is a poet in his own right, and … a sensitive translator of [Akhmatova]. Thomas refers to the ‘rich mysterious fluid life’ that her poetry has.… From his strong yet cautious rhythms, his solid musical phrasing, one [can] intuit the dark elegance of the original.”

Yorkshire Post




Anna Akhmatova (1889–1966) was part of that magnificent and in many ways tragic generation of Russian artists which came to first maturity before 1917, and which then had to come to terms with official discouragement and often persecution. As D.M. Thomas points out in his introduction, practically none of her poetry was published between 1923 and 1940. Her poetic range was wide, from the transparent anonymity of “Requiem” to the symphonic complexity of “Poem without a Hero.”

“Akhmatova’s example reminds us that while it is true that the writer cannot change the world alone, the world cannot change itself without her.”

Margaret Holly, poet, The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal