Elizabeth Schmidt

Elizabeth Schmidt is a professor of history at Loyola University Maryland. Her previous books include Mobilizing the Masses: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Nationalist Movement in Guinea, 1939–1958; Peasants, Traders, and Wives: Shona Women in the History of Zimbabwe, 1870–1939; and Decoding Corporate Camouflage: U.S. Business Support for Apartheid.

Listed in: African Studies · African History




Winner of the African Politics Conference Group’s Best Book Award

In September 1958, Guinea claimed its independence, rejecting a constitution that would have relegated it to junior partnership in the French Community. In all the French empire, Guinea was the only territory to vote “No.” Orchestrating the “No” vote was the Guinean branch of the Rassemblement Démocratique Africain (RDA), an alliance of political parties with affiliates in French West and Equatorial Africa and the United Nations trusts of Togo and Cameroon.

“A compelling narrative of the history of nation building in Guinea.... Schmidt deftly portrays the events from an African perspective, using colonial archives, interviews with activists, the era’s popular political songs, and photographs.... What simultaneously emerges in this nuanced treatment is a richer understanding of the pragmatic rather than purely visionary leadership of the famous Sékou Touré.”

CHOICE