Laureano Gómez was president of Colombia in the early 1950s until overthrown by a military coup. He was also, for some fifty years, the leading exponent of Latin American conservatism, a political philosophy with roots in both nineteenth–century politics and religion. Focusing on Gómez, and other prominent conservative politicians, Henderson traces the evolution of Latin American conservatism and demonstrates the scope of its influence throughout the continent.


Ken Saro-Wiwa
A penetrating, accessible portrait of the activist whose execution galvanized the world.


Nation on Board
Becoming Nigerian at Sea
Schler’s study of Nigerian seamen during Nigeria’s transition to independence provides a fresh perspective on the meaning of decolonization for ordinary Africans.


Culture and Money in the Nineteenth Century
Abstracting Economics
Since the 1980s, scholars have made the case for examining nineteenth-century culture — particularly literary output — through the lens of economics.


Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War
In the decades since the Vietnam War, veteran memoirs have influenced Americans’ understanding of the conflict. Yet few historians or literary scholars have scrutinized how the genre has shaped the nation’s collective memory of the war and its aftermath.


The Gun in Central Africa
A History of Technology and Politics
Examining the history of warfare and political development through a technological lens, Macola relates the study of military technology to the history of gender.