An assistant professor of history at the University of Vermont, Jonathan Huener has written on aspects of memorial culture in postwar Germany and Poland, and is co-editor, with Francis R. Nicosia, of Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany: Origins, Practices, Legacies.

Few places in the world carry as heavy a burden of history as Auschwitz. Recognized and remembered as the most prominent site of Nazi crimes, Auschwitz has had tremendous symbolic weight in the postwar world. Auschwitz, Poland, and the Politics of Commemoration is a history of the Auschwitz memorial site in the years of the Polish People's Republic. Since 1945, Auschwitz has functioned as a memorial and museum.


ArtBreak
A Creative Guide to Joyful and Productive Classrooms
Play is the central, universally significant activity of childhood. Self-directed play in which adults have a supporting rather than directing role is critical to the development and well-being of children.


Viet Nam
Tradition and Change
An accessible and erudite primer on Vietnamese history and culture from one of Việt Nam’s finest minds.


Cartography and the Political Imagination
Mapping Community in Colonial Kenya
Encompassing history, geography, and political science, MacArthur’s study evaluates the role of geographic imagination and the impact of cartography not only as means of expressing imperial power and constraining colonized populations, but as tools for the articulation of new political communities and resistance.


Marriage by Force?
Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa
Despite international human rights decrees condemning it, marriage by force persists to this day. In this volume, the editors bring together legal scholars, anthropologists, historians, and development workers to explore the range of forced marriage practices in sub-Saharan Africa.


The Bellwether
Why Ohio Picks the President
Every four years, Ohio finds itself in the thick of the presidential race. What about the Buckeye State makes it so special?