Katherine Ziff

Katherine Ziff is a mental health clinician, an exhibiting artist, and an adjunct professor in the counseling program at Ohio University. She has published in places such as the Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, the Journal for Specialists in Group Work, and History of Psychiatry. Ziff conducts workshops for counselors and educators, teaching the methods from her second book, ArtBreak.

Listed in: Architecture · Art · Education · American Studies · Ohio and Regional · Psychology

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ArtBreak · A Creative Guide to Joyful and Productive Classrooms
By Katherine Ziff

Play is the central, universally significant activity of childhood. Self-directed play in which adults have a supporting rather than directing role is critical to the development and well-being of children. This book is a flexible and accessible guide to encourage art-based play and allow children to explore, plan, and pursue their own interests.

“Katherine Ziff shows a wonderful sense of how adults can positively impact children’s development through child-directed play. She effectively demonstrates the concepts, process, and materials for success and supports her model with research. Counselors, teachers, and parents can all benefit from this book.”

Richard J. Hazler, author of The Emerging Professional Counselor




2013 Ohioana Book Award Finalist

Asylum on the Hill · History of a Healing Landscape
By Katherine Ziff · Foreword by Samuel T. Gladding · Afterword by Joseph Shields and Shawna Bolin

Asylum on the Hill is the story of a great American experiment in psychiatry, a revolution in care for those with mental illness, as seen through the example of the Athens Lunatic Asylum. Katherine Ziff’s compelling presentation incorporates rare photos, letters, maps, and records, offering readers a fascinating glimpse into psychiatric history.

“Anyone who peruses Ziff’s work will not have an easy time putting it down. This book is more than a history of a time, a place, a movement, and a people. It is instead a sensitive and centered examination.… Her portraits of people who influenced the asylum are wonderfully rendered … alive and moving.”

Samuel T. Gladding, Wake Forest University