Meredith Terretta

Meredith Terretta is an associate professor of history at the University of Ottawa and the author of Petitioning for Our Rights, Fighting for Our Nation: The History of the Democratic Union of Cameroonian Women, 1949–1960.

Listed in: African Studies · History · African History · Law




African Asylum at a Crossroads · Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights
Edited by Iris Berger, Tricia Redeker Hepner, Benjamin N. Lawrance, Joanna T. Tague, and Meredith Terretta · Foreword by Penelope Andrews · Afterword by Fallou Ngom

African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights examines the emerging trend of requests for expert opinions in asylum hearings or refugee status determinations. This is the first book to explore the role of court-based expertise in relation to African asylum cases and the first to establish a rigorous analytical framework for interpreting the effects of this new reliance on expert testimony.

“This is a first-rate collection of original essays focused on asylum jurisprudence involving African refugees…. These essays are provocative, well documented, and eloquent. The authors examine a subject that has been largely overlooked: the extraordinarily significant role of experts in legal processes…. The impressive contributors are anthropologists, historians, and legal scholars who offer provocative remarks about cases including many in which they served as expert witnesses.”

Alison Dundes Renteln, professor of political science and anthropology at the School of Policy, Planning, and Development and Law, University of Southern California




Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence · Nationalism, Grassfields Tradition, and State Building in Cameroon
By Meredith Terretta

Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence is the first extensive history of Cameroonian nationalism to consider the global and local influences that shaped the movement within the French and British Cameroons and beyond.

“Meredith Terretta’s book constitutes a highly significant contribution to the historiography of Cameroon, West Africa, and African nationalism more generally.… In challenging conventional political and cultural understandings of Cameroonian nationalism and its chronological development, the [work] makes important theoretical contributions to the field … and serves as an important model for future studies of African nationalism.”

Elizabeth Schmidt, author of Cold War and Decolonization in Guinea, 1946–1958