Peter W. Sinnema

Peter W. Sinnema is an associate professor of English at the University of Alberta. He is author of Dynamics of the Pictured Page: Representing the Nation in the Illustrated London News and editor of the Oxford World's Classics edition of Self-Help by Samuel Smiles.

Listed in: Victorian Studies · Art History · History · British History · European History · Comics and Graphic Novel Culture · Literary Studies

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Drawing on the Victorians · The Palimpsest of Victorian and Neo-Victorian Graphic Texts
Edited by Anna Maria Jones and Rebecca N. Mitchell · Afterword by Kate Flint

Late nineteenth-century Britain experienced an unprecedented explosion of visual print culture and a simultaneous rise in literacy across social classes. New printing technologies facilitated quick and cheap dissemination of images—illustrated books, periodicals, cartoons, comics, and ephemera—to a mass readership. This Victorian visual turn prefigured the present-day impact of the Internet on how images are produced and shared, both driving and reflecting the visual culture of its time.

“Stunningly transnational … The editors take the notion of the palimpsest as their conceptual frame because it speaks to haunting of one text and/or image by another, a layering, they assert, that becomes particularly complex when linguistic, geographic, historical, and temporal boundaries are crossed.”

David L. Pike, American University




The Wake of Wellington · Englishness in 1852
By Peter W. Sinnema

Soldier, hero, and politician, the Duke of Wellington is one of the best-known figures of nineteenth-century England. From his victory at Waterloo over Napoleon in 1815, he rose to become prime minister of his country. But Peter Sinnema finds equal fascination in Victorian England's response to the Duke's death.

“The scholarship is impeccable, and the analysis both thorough and subtle; it is easy to read and full of useful and fascinating information.The Wake of Wellington should be read by anyone interested in the Victorian period.”

Victorian Studies