Nomadic Voices of Exile
Feminine Identity in the Francophone Literature of the Maghreb

By Valérie K. Orlando

Contemporary French writing on the Maghreb—that part of Africa above the Sahara—is truly postmodern in scope, the rich product of multifaceted histories promoting the blending of two worlds, two identities, two cultures, and two languages.

Nomadic Voices of Exile demonstrates how that postmodern sentiment has altered perceptions concerning Maghrebian feminine identity since the end of the French-colonial era. The authors discussed here, both those who reside in the Maghreb and those who have had to seek asylum in France, find themselves at the intersection of French and North African viewpoints, exposing a complicated world that must be negotiated and redefined.

In looking at the authors whose writings extend beyond a gender-based dialogue to include such issues as race, politics, religion, and history, Valérie Orlando explores the rich and changing landscape of the literature and the culture, addresses the stereotypes that have defined the past, and navigates the space of the exiled, a space previously at the peripheries of Western discourse.

Nomadic Voices of Exile will be useful to a variety of classrooms—women's studies, Middle East studies, Francophone literature, Third World women writers—and to anyone interested in postcolonial and postmodern theory and philosophy and the history of the Maghreb through literature.


Valérie K. Orlando is professor of French and Francophone Literatures in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Order a print copy

Hardcover · $48 · Add to Cart

Retail price: $60.00 · Save 20% ($48)

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Related Subjects

African Literature · Gender Studies · Women’s Studies · African Studies

Formats

Hardcover

978-0-8214-1262-6
Retail price: $60.00, S.
Release date: Jul. 1999
256 pages
Rights: World