South Africa's Resistance Press is a collection of essays celebrating the contributions of scores of newspapers, newsletters, and magazines that confronted the state in the generation after 1960. These publications contributed in no small measure to reviving a mass movement inside South Africa that would finally bring an end to apartheid. This marginalized press had an impact on its audience that cannot be measured in terms of the small number of issues sold, the limited amount of advertising revenue raised, or the relative absence of effective marketing and distribution strategies. These journalists rendered communities visible that were too often invisible and provided a voice for those too often voiceless. They contributed immeasurably to broadening the concept of a free press in South Africa. The guardians of the new South Africa owe these publications a debt of gratitude that cannot be repaid.

Les Switzer is a professor in the School of Communication and an adjunct professor in the Department of History at the University of Houston. He is the author of many books and articles on South Africa, including South Africa's Alternative Press: Voices of Protest and Resistance, 1880-1960.

Mohamed Adhikari lectures in the Department of Historical Studies, University of Cape Town. His books include “Let Us Live for Our Children”: The Teachers’ League of South Africa, 1913–1940, and he coedited South Africa's Resistance Press: Alternative Voices in the Last Generation under Apartheid (Ohio, 2000).

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Cover of 'South Africa’s Resistance Press'


Paperback edition

978-0-89680-213-1 · Retail price: $39.95 · Release date: Dec. 2000 · 472 pages · Rights: World

In Series

Research in International Studies, Africa Series

Related Subjects

African Studies · Journalism · African History · History

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