Before he joined the staff of Punch and designed its iconic front cover, illustrator Richard “Dicky” Doyle was a young man whose father (political caricaturist John Doyle) charged him with sending a weekly letter, even though they lived under the same roof. This volume collects the fifty-three illustrated missives in their entirety for the first time and provides an uncommon peek into the intimate but expansive observations of a precocious social commentator and artist.


Space, Place, Architecture

Edited by Patricia M. Locke and Rachel McCann

The first collection devoted to Merleau-Ponty’s contributions to our understanding of architecture and place.

Authentically African

Arts and the Transnational Politics of Congolese Culture

By Sarah Van Beurden

Together, the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren, Belgium, and the Institut des Musées Nationaux du Zaire (IMNZ) in the Congo have defined and marketed Congolese art and culture. In Authentically African, Sarah Van Beurden traces the relationship between the possession, definition, and display of art and the construction of cultural authenticity and political legitimacy from the late colonial until the postcolonial era.

Frantz Fanon

Toward a Revolutionary Humanism

By Christopher J. Lee

A timely and original short biography of Fanon.

The Experiment Must Continue

Medical Research and Ethics in East Africa, 1940–2014

By Melissa Graboyes

A daring history that redefines the ethics of medical experimentation.

In Slavery, Agriculture, and Malaria in the Arabian Peninsula, Benjamin Reilly illuminates a previously unstudied phenomenon: the large-scale employment of people of African ancestry as slaves in agricultural oases within the Arabian Peninsula.

Preaching Prevention

Born-Again Christianity and the Moral Politics of AIDS in Uganda

By Lydia Boyd

Preaching Prevention examines the controversial U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) initiative to “abstain and be faithful” as a primary prevention strategy in Africa. This ethnography of the born-again Christians who led the new anti-AIDS push in Uganda provides insight into both what it means for foreign governments to “export” approaches to care and treatment and the ways communities respond to and repurpose such projects.

Gendered Lives in the Western Indian Ocean

Islam, Marriage, and Sexuality on the Swahili Coast

Edited by Erin E. Stiles and Katrina Daly Thompson
Afterword by Susan F. Hirsch

A breakthrough study of the underexamined lived experience of Islam, sexuality, and gender on the Swahili coast.

Bridges history and ethnography to explore stories of Malagasy ancestry and African American identity.

Crossing the Color Line

Race, Sex, and the Contested Politics of Colonialism in Ghana

By Carina E. Ray

Interracial sex mattered to the British colonial state in West Africa. In Crossing the Color Line, Carina E. Ray goes beyond this fact to reveal how Ghanaians shaped and defined these powerfully charged relations. The interplay between African and European perspectives and practices, argues Ray, transformed these relationships into key sites for consolidating colonial rule and for contesting its hierarchies of power.