The Jerrie Mock Story

The First Woman to Fly Solo around the World

By Nancy Roe Pimm

In the third installment of our series Biographies for Young Readers, Nancy Roe Pimm gives us the life of Jerrie Mock, who in 1964 became the first woman to fly solo around the world. Mock, born in Newark, Ohio, received little attention for her feat, despite accomplishing what her childhood heroine Amelia Earhart died trying. Meticulously researched, Mock’s story as presented by Pimm is engaging, accessible, and packed with inspiration for middle-grade readers aspiring to adventure.

The Common Lot and Other Stories

The Published Short Fiction, 1908–1921

By Emma Bell Miles
Edited by Grace Toney Edwards
Introduction by Grace Toney Edwards

The seventeen narratives of The Common Lot and Other Stories, published in popular magazines across the United States between 1908 and 1921 and collected here for the first time, are driven by Emma Bell Miles’s singular vision of the mountain people of her home in southeastern Tennessee. That vision is shaped by her strong sense of social justice, her naturalist’s sensibility, and her insider’s perspective.

Reading for Health

Medical Narratives and the Nineteenth-Century Novel

By Erika Wright

In Reading for Health: Medical Narratives and the Nineteenth-Century Novel, Erika Wright argues that the emphasis in Victorian Studies on disease as the primary source of narrative conflict that must be resolved has obscured the complex reading practices that emerge around the concept of health.

The Hairdresser of Harare, which the New York Times Book Review called “a fresh and moving account of contemporary Zimbabwe,” announced Tendai Huchu as a shrewd and funny social commentator. In The Maestro, the Magistrate & the Mathematician, Huchu expands his focus from Zimbabwe to the lives of expatriates in Edinburgh, Scotland. The novel follows three Zimbabwean men as they struggle to find places for themselves in Scotland.

Postcards from Stanland

Journeys in Central Asia

By David H. Mould

Central Asia has long stood at the crossroads of history. It was the staging ground for the armies of the Mongol Empire, for the nineteenth-century struggle between the Russian and British empires, and for the NATO campaign in Afghanistan. Today, multinationals and nations compete for the oil and gas reserves of the Caspian Sea and for control of the pipelines. Yet “Stanland” is still, to many, a terra incognita, a geographical blank.

Merleau-Ponty

Space, Place, Architecture

Edited by Patricia M. Locke and Rachel McCann

The first collection devoted to Merleau-Ponty’s contributions to our understanding of architecture and place.

Captured Peace

Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador

By Christine J. Wade

The most comprehensive, up-to-date book on Salvadoran politics of the last twenty-five years.

Before he joined the staff of Punch and designed its iconic front cover, illustrator Richard “Dicky” Doyle was a young man whose father (political caricaturist John Doyle) charged him with sending a weekly letter, even though they lived under the same roof. This volume collects the fifty-three illustrated missives in their entirety for the first time and provides an uncommon peek into the intimate but expansive observations of a precocious social commentator and artist.

Under Ohio

The Story of Ohio’s Rocks and Fossils

By Charles Ferguson Barker

A geologist takes young readers underground to reveal the fascinating story of Ohio’s geology.