The Message of the City

Dawn Powell’s New York Novels, 1925–1962

By Patricia E. Palermo

Dawn Powell was a gifted satirist often compared to Mark Twain. She moved in the same circles as Dorothy Parker, Ernest Hemingway, renowned editor Maxwell Perkins, and other midcentury New York luminaries. Her sixteen novels are typically divided into two groups: those dealing with her native Ohio and those set in New York.

A Stitch in Time

The Needlework of Aging Women in Antebellum America

By Aimee E. Newell

Drawing from 167 examples of decorative needlework — primarily samplers and quilts from 114 collections across the United States — made by individual women aged forty years and over between 1820 and 1860, this exquisitely illustrated book explores how women experienced social and cultural change in antebellum America.

Protecting the Empire’s Frontier

Officers of the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot during Its North American Service, 1767–1776

By Steven M. Baule

Protecting the Empire’s Frontier tells stories of the roughly eighty officers who served in the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot, which served British interests in America during the crucial period from 1767 through 1776.

Visions of Loveliness

Great Flower Breeders of the Past

By Judith M. Taylor

Gardeners of today take for granted the many varieties of geraniums, narcissi, marigolds, roses, and other beloved flowers for their gardens. Few give any thought at all to how this incredible abundance came to be or to the people who spent a good part of their lives creating it. These breeders once had prosperous businesses and were important figures in their communities but are only memories now. They also could be cranky and quirky.

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War

Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America’s Heartland

By Stephen E. Towne

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War represents pathbreaking research on the rise of U.S. Army intelligence operations in the Midwest during the American Civil War and counters long-standing assumptions about Northern politics and society.

The Krio of West Africa

Islam, Culture, Creolization, and Colonialism in the Nineteenth Century

By Gibril R. Cole

Sierra Leone’s unique history, especially in the development and consolidation of British colonialism in West Africa, has made it an important site of historical investigation since the 1950s. Much of the scholarship produced in subsequent decades has focused on the “Krio,” descendants of freed slaves from the West Indies, North America, England, and other areas of West Africa, who settled Freetown, beginning in the late eighteenth century.

Hero of the Angry Sky

The World War I Diary and Letters of David S. Ingalls, America’s First Naval Ace

By David S. Ingalls
Edited by Geoffrey L. Rossano
Foreword by William F. Trimble

Draws on the unpublished diaries, correspondence, informal memoir, and other personal documents of the U.S. Navy’s only flying “ace” of World War I to tell his unique story.

The 1890s saw a revolution in advertising. Cheap paper, faster printing, rural mail delivery, railroad shipping, and chromolithography combined to pave the way for the first modern, mass-produced catalogs. The most prominent of these, reaching American households by the thousands, were seed and nursery catalogs with beautiful pictures of middle-class homes surrounded by sprawling lawns, exotic plants, and the latest garden accessories—in other words, the quintessential English-style garden.

Degrees of Allegiance

Harassment and Loyalty in Missouri's German-American Community during World War I

By Petra DeWitt

Historians have long argued that the Great War eradicated German culture from American soil. Degrees of Allegiance examines the experiences of German-Americans living in Missouri during the First World War, evaluating the personal relationships at the local level that shaped their lives and the way that they were affected by national war effort guidelines.

Indigenous knowledge has become a catchphrase in global struggles for environmental justice. Yet indigenous knowledges are often viewed, incorrectly, as pure and primordial cultural artifacts. This collection draws from African and North American cases to argue that the forms of knowledge identified as “indigenous” resulted from strategies to control environmental resources during and after colonial encounters.

In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln’s America.

With more than eighty full-color photographs, Parron documents a movement that combines rural economic development with an American folk art phenomenon.

Asylum on the Hill

History of a Healing Landscape

By Katherine Ziff
Foreword by Samuel T. Gladding

The story of a great American experiment in psychiatry, a revolution in care for those with mental illness, as seen through the example of the Athens Lunatic Asylum built in Southeast Ohio after the Civil War.

Castle’s correspondence with family members and with George Herbert Mead— one of America’s most influential philosophers and his best friend at Oberlin College—reveals many of the intellectual, economic, and cultural forces that shaped American thought.

During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status—and more importantly the status of slavery within them—paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions.

Authors, Editors, and other Contributors

Thomas Zeller is an associate professor at the University of Maryland, where he teaches the history of technology, environmental history, and science and technology studies.…

Andrew R. L. Cayton, distinguished professor of history at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, is the author of several books, including Ohio: The History of a People and, with Fred Anderson, The Dominion of War: Liberty and Empire in North America, 1500–2000.…

Professor and chair of the department of sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, William W. Falk published Forgotten Places: Uneven Development in Rural America (edited with Thomas A. Lyson) and In the Lion's Mouth: A Story about Race and Place in the American South (forthcoming).…

Danuta Mostwin emigrated to America in 1951.…

Jennifer Rose is the author of The Old Direction of Heaven (2000) and the recipient of awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Poetry Society of America, among others.…

Norman Gross is the former director of the ABA Museum of Law in Chicago and the editor of America's Lawyer-Presidents: From Law Office to Oval Office.…

Captain Frederick Way, Jr.…

Barbara Kreiger is the author of The Dead Sea: Myth, History, and Politics.…

David J. Bodenhamer is a professor of history and the executive director of The Polis Center at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis.…

Katherine Hoyt lived for eighteen years in Latin America, sixteen of them in Nicaragua.…