Trapeze

The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955

By Anaïs Nin
Edited by Paul Herron
Introduction by Benjamin Franklin V
Preface by Paul Herron

Anaïs Nin made her reputation through publication of her edited diaries and the carefully constructed persona they presented. It was not until decades later, when the diaries were published in their unexpurgated form, that the world began to learn the full details of Nin’s fascinating life and the emotional and literary high-wire acts she committed both in documenting it and in defying the mores of 1950s America.

Empowering the Public-Private Partnership

The Future of America's Local Government

By George V. Voinovich

America’s urban centers face many challenges, from decaying infrastructure to declining population and a falling tax base. At the same time, there is increasing interest in cities as sites of renewal and economic opportunity. How can city leaders facing financial constraints harness this positive energy in a sustainable way?

Virginia Hamilton

America’s Storyteller

By Julie K. Rubini

In Virginia Hamilton, Julie K. Rubini brings us the biography of one of the most honored authors of children’s literature in the twentieth century. The most expansive biography of Hamilton published for young readers, it was vetted for accuracy by Hamilton’s husband, poet Arnold Adoff. It is the fourth installment in the Biographies for Young Readers series, which is quickly building a reputation for substantive and engaging treatments of its diverse subjects.

The Message of the City

Dawn Powell’s New York Novels, 1925–1962

By Patricia E. Palermo

Dawn Powell was a gifted satirist who moved in the same circles as Dorothy Parker, Ernest Hemingway, renowned editor Maxwell Perkins, and other midcentury New York luminaries. Her many novels are typically divided into two groups: those dealing with her native Ohio and those set in New York.

Writing an Icon

Celebrity Culture and the Invention of Anaïs Nin

By Anita Jarczok

Anaïs Nin, the diarist, novelist, and provocateur, occupied a singular space in twentieth-century culture, not only as a literary figure and voice of female sexual liberation but as a celebrity and symbol of shifting social mores in postwar America. Before Madonna and her many imitators, there was Nin; yet, until now, there has been no major study of Nin as a celebrity figure.

A Stitch in Time

The Needlework of Aging Women in Antebellum America

By Aimee E. Newell

Drawing from 167 examples of decorative needlework — primarily samplers and quilts from 114 collections across the United States — made by individual women aged forty years and over between 1820 and 1860, this exquisitely illustrated book explores how women experienced social and cultural change in antebellum America.

Protecting the Empire’s Frontier

Officers of the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot during Its North American Service, 1767–1776

By Steven M. Baule

Protecting the Empire’s Frontier tells stories of the roughly eighty officers who served in the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot, which served British interests in America during the crucial period from 1767 through 1776.

Visions of Loveliness

Great Flower Breeders of the Past

By Judith M. Taylor

Gardeners of today take for granted the many varieties of geraniums, narcissi, marigolds, roses, and other beloved flowers for their gardens. Few give any thought at all to how this incredible abundance came to be or to the people who spent a good part of their lives creating it. These breeders once had prosperous businesses and were important figures in their communities but are only memories now. They also could be cranky and quirky.

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War

Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America’s Heartland

By Stephen E. Towne

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War represents pathbreaking research on the rise of U.S. Army intelligence operations in the Midwest during the American Civil War and counters long-standing assumptions about Northern politics and society.

The Krio of West Africa

Islam, Culture, Creolization, and Colonialism in the Nineteenth Century

By Gibril R. Cole

Sierra Leone’s unique history, especially in the development and consolidation of British colonialism in West Africa, has made it an important site of historical investigation since the 1950s. Much of the scholarship produced in subsequent decades has focused on the “Krio,” descendants of freed slaves from the West Indies, North America, England, and other areas of West Africa, who settled Freetown, beginning in the late eighteenth century.

America’s Romance with the English Garden is the story of the beginnings of the modern garden industry, which seduced the masses with its images and fixed the English garden in the mind of the American consumer; the story of tastemakers and homemakers, of savvy businessmen and a growing American middle class eager to buy their products.

Degrees of Allegiance

Harassment and Loyalty in Missouri's German-American Community during World War I

By Petra DeWitt

Historians have long argued that the Great War eradicated German culture from American soil. Degrees of Allegiance examines the experiences of German-Americans living in Missouri during the First World War, evaluating the personal relationships at the local level that shaped their lives and the way that they were affected by national war effort guidelines.

Indigenous knowledge has become a catchphrase in global struggles for environmental justice. Yet indigenous knowledges are often viewed, incorrectly, as pure and primordial cultural artifacts. This collection draws from African and North American cases to argue that the forms of knowledge identified as “indigenous” resulted from strategies to control environmental resources during and after colonial encounters.

With more than eighty full-color photographs, Parron documents a movement that combines rural economic development with an American folk art phenomenon.

Authors, Editors, and other Contributors

Thomas Zeller is an associate professor at the University of Maryland, where he teaches the history of technology, environmental history, and science and technology studies.…

Andrew R. L. Cayton, distinguished professor of history at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, is the author of several books, including Ohio: The History of a People and, with Fred Anderson, The Dominion of War: Liberty and Empire in North America, 1500–2000.…

Professor and chair of the department of sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, William W. Falk published Forgotten Places: Uneven Development in Rural America (edited with Thomas A. Lyson) and In the Lion's Mouth: A Story about Race and Place in the American South (forthcoming).…

Danuta Mostwin emigrated to America in 1951.…

Jennifer Rose is the author of The Old Direction of Heaven (2000) and the recipient of awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Poetry Society of America, among others.…

Norman Gross is the former director of the ABA Museum of Law in Chicago and the editor of America's Lawyer-Presidents: From Law Office to Oval Office.…

Captain Frederick Way, Jr.…

Barbara Kreiger is the author of The Dead Sea: Myth, History, and Politics.…

David J. Bodenhamer is a professor of history and the executive director of The Polis Center at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis.…

Katherine Hoyt lived for eighteen years in Latin America, sixteen of them in Nicaragua.…