Feeding Globalization · Madagascar and the Provisioning Trade, 1600–1800 · By Jane Hooper

Between 1600 and 1800, the promise of fresh food attracted more than seven hundred English, French, and Dutch vessels to Madagascar. Throughout this period, European ships spent months at sea in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, but until now scholars have not fully examined how crews were fed during these long voyages. Without sustenance from Madagascar, European traders would have struggled to transport silver to Asia and spices back to Europe.

Cover of 'Feeding Globalization'


Children of Hope · The Odyssey of the Oromo Slaves from Ethiopia to South Africa · By Sandra Rowoldt Shell

In Children of Hope, Sandra Rowoldt Shell details the life histories of sixty-four Oromo children who were enslaved in Ethiopia in the late nineteenth century, liberated by the British navy, and ultimately sent to a Free Church of Scotland mission in South Africa, where their stories were recorded through a series of interviews.



European Slave Trading in the Indian Ocean, 1500–1850 · By Richard B. Allen

Between 1500 and 1850, European traders shipped hundreds of thousands of African, Indian, Malagasy, and Southeast Asian slaves to ports throughout the Indian Ocean world. The activities of the British, Dutch, French, and Portuguese traders who operated in the Indian Ocean demonstrate that European slave trading was not confined largely to the Atlantic but must now be viewed as a truly global phenomenon.

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Gendered Lives in the Western Indian Ocean · Islam, Marriage, and Sexuality on the Swahili Coast · Edited by Erin E. Stiles and Katrina Daly Thompson · Afterword by Susan F. Hirsch

A breakthrough study of the underexamined lived experience of Islam, sexuality, and gender on the Swahili coast.

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Memories of Madagascar and Slavery in the Black Atlantic · By Wendy Wilson-Fall · Foreword by Michael Gomez

Bridges history and ethnography to explore stories of Malagasy ancestry and African American identity.

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Slavery, Agriculture, and Malaria in the Arabian Peninsula · By Benjamin Reilly

In Slavery, Agriculture, and Malaria in the Arabian Peninsula, Benjamin Reilly illuminates a previously unstudied phenomenon: the large-scale employment of people of African ancestry as slaves in agricultural oases within the Arabian Peninsula.

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Sex, Power, and Slavery · Edited by Gwyn Campbell and Elizabeth Elbourne

Twenty-six authors from diverse scholarly backgrounds look at the vexed, traumatic intersections of the histories of slavery and of sexuality. They argue that such intersections mattered profoundly and, indeed, that slavery cannot be understood without adequate attention to sexuality.

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The Krio of West Africa · Islam, Culture, Creolization, and Colonialism in the Nineteenth Century · By Gibril R. Cole

Sierra Leone’s unique history, especially in the development and consolidation of British colonialism in West Africa, has made it an important site of historical investigation since the 1950s. Much of the scholarship produced in subsequent decades has focused on the “Krio,” descendants of freed slaves from the West Indies, North America, England, and other areas of West Africa, who settled Freetown, beginning in the late eighteenth century.

Cover of 'The Krio of West Africa'


Illinois’s War · The Civil War in Documents · Edited by Mark Hubbard

On the eve of the Civil War and after, Illinois was one of the most significant states in the Union. Its history is, in many respects, the history of the Union writ large: its political leaders figured centrally in the war’s origins, progress, and legacies; and its diverse residents made sacrifices and contributions—both on the battlefield and on the home front—that proved essential to Union victory.

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Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s · Edited by Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon

During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status—and more importantly the status of slavery within them—paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions.

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In the Shadow of Freedom · The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital · Edited by Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon

Few images of early America were more striking, and jarring, than that of slaves in the capital city of the world’s most important free republic. Black slaves served and sustained the legislators, bureaucrats, jurists, cabinet officials, military leaders, and even the presidents who lived and worked there.

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Child Slaves in the Modern World · Edited by Gwyn Campbell, Suzanne Miers, and Joseph C. Miller

Child Slaves in the Modern World is the second of two volumes that examine the distinctive uses and experiences of children in slavery in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This collection of previously unpublished essays exposes the global victimization of child slaves from the period of abolition of legal slavery in the nineteenth century to the human rights era of the twentieth century.

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The Dred Scott Case · Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law · Edited by David Thomas Konig, Paul Finkelman, and Christopher Alan Bracey

In 1846 two slaves, Dred and Harriet Scott, filed petitions for their freedom in the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri. As the first true civil rights case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, Dred Scott v. Sandford raised issues that have not been fully resolved despite three amendments to the Constitution and more than a century and a half of litigation.

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Abolitionism and Imperialism in Britain, Africa, and the Atlantic · Edited by Derek R. Peterson

The abolition of the slave trade is normally understood to be the singular achievement of eighteenth-century British liberalism. Abolitionism and Imperialism in Britain, Africa, and the Atlantic expands both the temporal and the geographic framework in which the history of abolitionism is conceived.

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Slavery, Emancipation and Colonial Rule in South Africa · By Wayne Dooling

Slavery, Emancipation and Colonial Rule in South Africa examines the rural Cape Colony from the earliest days of Dutch colonial rule in the mid-seventeenth century to the outbreak of the South African War in 1899. For slaves and slave owners alike, incorporation into the British Empire at the beginning of the nineteenth century brought fruits that were bittersweet.

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Authors, Editors, and other Contributors

Niklas Thode Jensen

Niklas Thode Jensen is a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of History and Civilization at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy.…

Richard B. Allen

Richard B. Allen is the author of Slaves, Freedmen, and Indentured Laborers in Colonial Mauritius and numerous articles on the social and economic history of Mauritius as well as slavery and indentured labor in the Indian Ocean and colonial plantation worlds.…