This series aims to provide stimulating, thoughtful, and provocative academic studies that focus on the experience of people outside Europe and North America or that include Western and non-Western countries and regions in comparative studies of the global experience. The series looks for high-quality manuscripts in the social sciences and the humanities.

All books in the series are published in association with the Center for International Studies at Ohio University.


Editors

Gillian Berchowitz, Executive Editor
Research in International Studies
Ohio University Press



Obama and Kenya · Contested Histories and the Politics of Belonging

By Matthew Carotenuto and Katherine Luongo

Barack Obama’s political ascendancy has focused worldwide attention on Kenya. Carotenuto and Luongo argue that efforts to cast Obama as a “son of the soil” of the Lake Victoria basin invite insights into the politicized uses of Kenya’s past. Ideal for classroom use and directed at a general readership interested in global affairs, Obama and Kenya offers an important counterpoint to the many popular, but inaccurate texts about Kenya’s history and Obama’s place in it.


Bridges history and ethnography to explore stories of Malagasy ancestry and African American identity.


Violence · Analysis, Intervention, and Prevention

By Sean Byrne and Jessica Senehi





Hanging by a Thread · Cotton, Globalization, and Poverty in Africa

Edited by William G. Moseley and Leslie C. Gray

Hanging by a Thread illuminates the connections between Africa and the global economy. The editors offer a compelling set of linked studies that detail one aspect of the globalization process in Africa, the cotton commodity chain.


Cast Out · Vagrancy and Homelessness in Global and Historical Perspective

Edited by A. L. Beier and Paul Ocobock


Under the Heel of the Dragon · Islam, Racism, Crime, and the Uighur in China

By Blaine Kaltman

The Turkic Muslims known as the Uighur have long faced social and economic disadvantages in China because of their minority status.



Aimed at practitioners and policy makers, and essential reading for students of war, humanitarian intervention, peace building, and development, Civil War, Civil Peace provides an examination of how interventions can be improved through a better understanding of the roots of war and of the grievances and interests that fueled the war.


Military Intervention after the Cold War · The Evolution of Theory and Practice

By Andrea Kathryn Talentino

For hundreds of years, military intervention in another country was considered taboo and prohibited by international law. Since 1992, intervention has often been described as an international responsibility, and efforts have been made to give it legal justification. This extraordinary change in perceptions has taken place in only the space of a decade.



Communities of Work · Rural Restructuring in Local and Global Contexts

Edited by William W. Falk, Michael D. Schulman, and Ann R. Tickamyer

The image of rural America portrayed in this illuminating study is one that is vibrant, regionally varied, and sometimes heroic. Communities of Work focuses on the ways in which rural people and places are affected by political, social, and economic forces far outside their control and how they sustain themselves and their communities in response.


Ethnic Conflict · Religion, Identity, and Politics

Edited by S. A. Giannakos

The outbreak of numerous and simultaneous violent conflicts around the globe in the past decade resulted in immense human suffering and countless lost lives. In part, both results were aided by inactivity or by belated and often misplaced responses by the international community to the embattled groups.