This series, edited by David H. Burton and Clarence E. Wunderlin, Jr., appears in eight volumes. It presents the published works of the native Ohioan and twenty-seventh president, his presidential and state addresses, and selected court opinions from his days as chief justice of the Supreme Court.

Editors

David H. Burton, General Editor
Clarence E. Wunderlin, Jr., Editor

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume VIII

“Liberty under Law” and Selected Supreme Court Opinions

Edited by Francis Graham Lee

William Howard Taft’s presidency (1909-1913), succeeding Theodore Roosevelt’s, was mired in bitter partisan fighting, and Taft sometimes blundered politically. However, this son of Cincinnati assumed his true calling when President Warren G. Harding appointed him to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1921. Taft remains the only person to have served both as president of the United States and as chief justice of the Supreme Court.

Eager to turn the congressional election of 1918 into a confirmation of his foreign policy, President Woodrow Wilson was criticized for abandoning the spirit of the popular slogan “Politics adjourned!” His predecessor, William Howard Taft, found Wilson difficult to deal with and took issue with his version of the League of Nations, which Taft felt was inferior to the model proposed by the League to Enforce Peace.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume II

Political Issues and Outlooks: Speeches Delivered Between August 1908 and February 1909

Edited by David H. Burton

The second volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft is dedicated to the speeches and writings that displayed his thinking in the autumn of 1908 and the following winter. At this time he was campaigning for the presidency against the well-known William Jennings Bryan, and in Taft’s writings is evidence of the contrast in style between Taft and Bryan and between Taft and his predecessor, Teddy Roosevelt. as well.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume I

Four Aspects of Civic Duty & Present Day Problems

Edited by David H. Burton and A. E. Campbell

The inaugural volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft is composed of two of his earliest books, Four Aspects of Civic Duty and Present Day Problems.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume III

Presidential Addresses and State Papers

Edited by David H. Burton

The third volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft imparts an appreciation of the range of the twenty-seventh president’s interests. Beginning with his inaugural address and concluding with a detailed exposition of governmental expenses and needed economies, President William Howard Taft showed himself willing to tackle the routine as well as the rarified responsibilities of executive rule.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume VI

The President and His Powers and The United States and Peace

Edited by David H. Burton, W. Carey McWilliams, and Frank X. Gerrity

Volume VI of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft follows the career of William Howard Taft upon his leaving the White House. It consists of two short publications from 1914 and 1915. The first, The President and His Powers, is based on a series of lectures delivered at Columbia University and draws on Taft’s experience in the presidency and the executive branch.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume V

Popular Government and The Anti-trust Act and the Supreme Court

Edited by David H. Burton, David Potash, and Donald F. Anderson

The fifth volume of The Complete Works of William Howard Taft presents two publications Taft wrote as Kent Professor of Constitutional Law at Yale University, the position he assumed in 1913 after he was defeated in his bid for re-election as U.S. president. The first, Popular Government, was prepared for a series of lectures, but was motivated by Taft’s passion over the issue of constitutional interpretation, which had been hotly contested during the campaign.

The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume IV

Presidential Messages to Congress

Edited by David H. Burton

“A time when panics seem far removed is the best time to prepare our financial system to withstand a storm. The most crying need this country has is a proper banking and currency system. The existing one is inadequate, and everyone who has studied the question admits it.”—William Howard Taft The interaction between President William Howard Taft and the Congress provides a window on his leadership.