The Negro in the American Rebellion · His Heroism and His Fidelity · By William Wells Brown · Edited by John David Smith

In 1863, as the Civil War raged, the escaped slave, abolitionist, and novelist William Wells Brown identified two groups most harmful to his race. “The first and most relentless,” he explained, “are those who have done them the greatest injury, by being instrumental in their enslavement and consequent degradation.

Cover of 'The  Negro in the American Rebellion'


Athens, Ohio · The Village Years · By Robert L. Daniel

In a lively style peppered with firsthand accounts by the people who made Athens, author Robert L. Daniel narrates his tale with wry humor and a sharp eye for detail.

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The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio · Illustrations, History, Statistics · Edited by Fred W. Bush

Unique and invaluable portrait of a bustling turn–of–the–century community.

Cover of 'The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio'


The Golden Dream · Seekers of El Dorado · By Robert Silverberg

One of the most persistent legends in the annals of New World exploration is that of the Land of God. Its mythical site was located over vast areas of South American (and later, North America); it drove some men mad with greed and, often as not, to their deaths. In this amazing history of quest and adventure, Robert Silverberg traces the fate of Old World explorers lured westward by the myth of El Dorado.

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Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats · By Edward A. Mueller

As a Wisconsin historical marker explains: “After 1837 the vast timber resources of northern Wisconsin were eagerly sought by settlers moving into the mid-Mississippi valley. By 1847 there were more than thirty saw-mills on the Wisconsin, Chippewa, and St. Croix river systems, cutting largely Wisconsin white pine. During long winter months, logging crews felled and stacked logs on the frozen rivers. Spring thaws flushed the logs down the streams toward the Mississippi River.

Cover of 'Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats'


Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994 · Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America · By Frederick Way Jr. · Foreword by Joseph W. Rutter

The first Mississippi steamboat was a packet, the New Orleans, a sidewheeler built at Pittsburgh in 1811, designed for the New Orleans-Natchez trade. Packets dominated during the first forty years of steam, providing the quickest passenger transportation throughout mid-continent America. The packets remained fairly numerous even into the first two decades of the twentieth century when old age or calamity overtook them.

Cover of 'Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994'


To Possess the Land · A Biography of Arthur Rochford Manby · By Frank Waters

Ambitious and only 24 years old, Arthur Manby arrived from England in the Territory of New Mexico in 1883, and saw in its wilderness an empire that he believed himself destined to rule. For his kingdom, he chose a vast Spanish land grant near Taos, a wild 100,000 acres whose ancient title was beyond question. Obsessed, he poured more than 20 years into his dream of glory, and schemed, stole, lied, cajoled, begged, and bribed to take the vast grant from its rightful owners.

Cover of 'To Possess the Land'


George Montague Wheeler · The Man and the Myth · By Doris O. Dawdy

Until Dawdy's “The Wyant Diary” appeared in Arizona and the West in 1980, it was virtually unknown that Lt. Wheeler was the leader of the government exploring party from which artist A. H. Wyant returned with a paralyzed arm. So little used were government reports prior to the mid-twentieth century that not one of the writers and compilers of information about this prominent artist, known to have been with a military expedition, had looked at the most likely report, that of Lt.

Cover of 'George Montague Wheeler'


Weather Pioneers · The Signal Corps Station at Pikes Peak · By Phyllis Smith

At 14,110 feet, the weather station atop Pikes Peak, Colorado, was the highest in the world in 1873. Young men trained by the Signal Corps took turns living year-round on the isolated mountain, where they endured loneliness, primitive living conditions, lack of financial support and appreciation, and deteriorating health. Most did so with dedication and good humor.

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Timberline Tailings · Tales of Colorado’s Ghost Towns and Mining Camps · By Muriel Sibell Wolle

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An African American in South Africa · The Travel Notes of Ralph J. Bunche 28 September 1937–1 January 1938 · By Ralph Bunche · Edited by Robert R. Edgar

Ralph Bunche, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950, traveled to South Africa for three months in 1937. His notes, which have been skillfully compiled and annotated by historian Robert R. Edgar, provide unique insights on a segregated society.

Cover of 'An African American in South Africa'


Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850 · By Donald A. Hutslar

Log construction entered the Ohio territory with the seventeenth-century fur traders and mid-eighteenth-century squatters and then spread throughout most of the area after the opening of the territory in the 1780s. Scottish-Irish and German settlers, using techniques from the eastern states and European homelands, found the abundant timber resources of the Ohio country ideally suited to this simple, durable form of construction.

Cover of 'Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850'


Goldfield · The Last Gold Rush on The Western Frontier · By Sally Zanjani

“The discovery of Goldfield, Nevada, in 1902, along with the earlier discovery of Tonopah in 1900, marked the revival of mining in Nevada. Mining production, which had escalated after the discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1859, dropped to almost nothing with the decline of the Comstock in the 1870s. Without continued mining production, the state entered what proved to be a twenty-year depression period that ultimately led some observers to suggest that Nevada be deprived of its statehood.

Cover of 'Goldfield'


Tales Never Told Around the Campfire · True Stories of Frontier America · By Mark Dugan

Ten outlaws, ten states, ten stories of nineteenth-century fugitives remarkable because the events really took place. Mark Dugan’s latest outlaw chase reins in enough evidence to corral the cynics. There is new information on the strange relationship between Wild Bill Hickok, his enemy and victim, David McCanles, and the beautiful Sarah Shull of North Carolina. Was Tom Horn a hired killer for the big cattlemen in the unsolved Wyoming ambush? How much do we really know about Deputy U.S.

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Knight of the Road · The Life of Highwayman Ham White · By Mark Dugan

The American public has long been fascinated by the Old West and the so–called heroes that it produced. Even before the days of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and the dime novel, the public’s heroes have always been somewhat tainted. Numerous stories of chivalry and gallantry have been accredited to outlaws, but all tales have been based upon folklore and legends. Mark Dugan, however, gives us a bona fide American Robin Hood with Ham White.

Cover of 'Knight of the Road'