Alice Lakwena and the Holy Spirits · War in Northern Uganda, 1985–97 · By Heike Behrend

In August 1986, Alice Auma, a young Acholi woman in northern Uganda, proclaiming herself under the orders of a Christian spirit named Lakwena, raised an army called the “Holy Spirit Mobile Forces.” With it she waged a war against perceived evil, not only an external enemy represented by the National Resistance Army of the government, but internal enemies in the form of “impure” soldiers, witches, and sorcerers.

Cover of 'Alice Lakwena and the Holy Spirits'


The Quest for Fruition through Ngoma · The Political Aspects of Healing in Southern Africa · Edited by Rijk van Dijk, Ria Reis, and Maja Spierenburg

This study has arisen out of a fascination with the vibrant nature of African societies, their vitality, and particularly the way in which they seem to be able time and again to overcome tribulation and turmoil. In the southern African region, ngoma, an indigenous ritual of healing, dance, rhythm, and rhyme, is at the heart of the social effort of turning the tables for individuals and communities so that their well-being is restored.

Cover of 'The Quest for Fruition through Ngoma'


Controlling Anger · The Anthropology of Gisu Violence · By Suzette Heald

Controlling Anger examines the dilemmas facing rural people who live within the broader context of political instability. Following Uganda's independence from Britain in 1962, the Bagisu men of Southeastern Uganda developed a reputation for extreme violence.

Cover of 'Controlling Anger'


Transgressing Boundaries · New Directions in the Study of Culture in Africa · Edited by Brenda Cooper and Andrew Steyn

Transgressing Boundaries includes some of the most interesting debates informing cultural politics in South Africa today. To do so, it brings together renowned contributors from Africa, North America and the United Kingdom. The book questions the boundaries between the academic disciplines by incorporating literary studies with anthropology, history, archaeology, art and gender studies.

Cover of 'Transgressing Boundaries'


The Cape Herders · A History of the Khoikhoi of Southern Africa · By Emile Boonzaier, Candy Malherbe, Penny Berens, and Andy Smith

The Cape Herders provides the first comprehensive picture of the Khoikhoi people. In doing so, it fills a long-standing gap in the resources of Southern African studies, and at a time when interest in the indigenous populations of South Africa is growing daily. Combining the insights of archaeology, history, and anthropology, this account ranges from the origins of the Khoikhoi in Southern Africa to the contemporary politics of the Namaqualand “reserves.”

Cover of 'The Cape Herders'


Mau Mau from Below · By Greet Kershaw

John Lonsdale says in his introduction: “This is the oral evidence of the Kikuyu villagers with whom Greet Kershaw lived as an aid worker during the Mau Mau ‘Emergency’ in the 1950s, and which is now totally irrecoverable in any form save in her own field notes.

Cover of 'Mau Mau from Below'


Katutura: A Place Where We Stay · Life in a Post-Apartheid Township in Namibia · By Wade C. Pendleton

Katutura, located in Namibia’s major urban center and capital, Windhoek, was a township created by apartheid, and administered in the past by the most rigid machinery of the apartheid era. Namibia became a sovereign state in 1990, and Katutura reflects many of the changes that have taken place. No longer part of a rigidly bounded social system, people in Katutura today have the opportunity to enter and leave as their personal circumstances dictate.

Cover of 'Katutura: A Place Where We Stay'


Ecology Control and Economic Development in East African History · The Case of Tanganyika, 1850–1950 · By Helge Kjekshus

This pioneering book was one of the first to place the history of East Africa within the context of the environment. It has been used continuously for student teaching. It is now reissued with an introduction placing it within the debate that has developed on the subject; there is also an updated bibliography. The book puts people at the centre of events. It thus serves as a modification to nationalist history with its emphasis on leaders.

Cover of 'Ecology Control and Economic Development in East African History'


Traditional Healers and Childhood in Zimbabwe · By Pamela Reynolds

Based on the author’s fieldwork among the people of Zezuru, this study focuses on children as clients and as healers in training. In Reynolds’s ethnographic investigation of possession and healing, she pays particular attention to the way healers are identified and authenticated in communities, and how they are socialized in the use of medicinal plants, dreams, and ritual healing practices.

Cover of 'Traditional Healers and Childhood in Zimbabwe'


The History and Conservation of Zanzibar Stone Town · By Abdul Sheriff

Zanzibar Stone Town presents the problems of conservation in its most acute forms. Should it be fossilized for the tourists? Or should it grow for the benefit of the inhabitants? Can ways be found to accommodate conflicting social and economic pressures? For its size, Zanzibar, like Venice, occupies a remarkably large romantic space in world imagination. Swahili civilization on these spice islands goes back to the earliest centuries of the Islamic era.

Cover of 'The History and Conservation of Zanzibar Stone Town'


Ethnicity & Conflict in the Horn of Africa · By Katsuyoshi Fukui

Composed of eleven studies on the Horn of Africa, the book is based on primary research by David Turton, Hiroshi Matsuda, John Lamphear, Eisei Kurimoro, Wendy James, P.T.W. Baxter, Tim Allen and others.

Cover of 'Ethnicity & Conflict in the Horn of Africa'


Forests of Gold · Essays on the Akan and the Kingdom of Asante · By Ivor Wilks

Forests of Gold is a collection of essays on the peoples of Ghana with particular reference to the most powerful of all their kingdoms: Asante. Beginning with the global and local conditions under which Akan society assumed its historic form between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries, these essays go on to explore various aspects of Asante culture: conceptions of wealth, of time and motion, and the relationship between the unborn, the living, and the dead.

Cover of 'Forests of Gold'


A Bed Called Home · Life in the Migrant Labour Hostels of Cape Town · By Mamphela Ramphele · Photography by Roger Meintjes

In the last three years the migrant labor hostels of South Africa, particularly those in the Transvaal, have gained international notoriety as theaters of violence. For many years they were hidden from public view and neglected by the white authorities. Now, it seems, hostel dwellers may have chosen physical violence to draw attention to the structural violence of their appalling conditions of life.

Cover of 'A Bed Called Home'


Being Maasai · Ethnicity and Identity In East Africa · Edited by Thomas Spear and Richard Waller

Everyone “knows” the Maasai as proud pastoralists who once dominated the Rift Valley from northern Kenya to central Tanzania. But many people who identity themselves as Maasai, or who speak Maa, are not pastoralist at all, but farmers and hunters. Over time many different people have “become” something else. And what it means to be Maasai has changed radically over the past several centuries and is still changing today.

Cover of 'Being Maasai'


Swahili Origins · Swahili Culture and The Shungwaya Phenomenon · By James de Vere Allen

Kiswahili has become the lingua franca of eastern Africa. Yet there can be few historic peoples whose identity is as elusive as that of the Swahili. Some have described themselves as Arabs, as Persians or even, in one place, as Portuguese. It is doubtful whether, even today, most of the people about whom this book is written would unhesitatingly and in all contexts accept the name Swahili. This book was central to the thought and lifework of the late James de Vere Allen.

Cover of 'Swahili Origins'