Winold Reiss and the Cincinnati Union Terminal · Fanfare for the Common Man · By Gretchen Garner

After designing and installing the massive murals for the Cincinnati Union Terminal in the 1930s, German immigrant artist Winold Reiss fell into relative obscurity, despite the vibrancy and boldness of his meticulous mosaic works. Art historian Garner pays this early modernist his due, putting him in the context of his international peers and the art movements that continue to invigorate our aesthetic landscape today.

Cover of 'Winold Reiss and the Cincinnati Union Terminal'


Merleau-Ponty · Space, Place, Architecture · Edited by Patricia M. Locke and Rachel McCann

The first collection devoted to Merleau-Ponty’s contributions to our understanding of architecture and place.

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A Historical Guidebook to Old Columbus · Finding the Past in the Present in Ohio’s Capital City · By Bob Hunter · Photography by Lucy S. Wolfe

A Historical Guidebook to Old Columbus invites Columbus’s families to rediscover their city with a treasure trove of stories from its past and suggests to visitors and new residents many interesting places that they might not otherwise find. This new book is certain to amuse and inform for years to come.

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Asylum on the Hill · History of a Healing Landscape · By Katherine Ziff · Foreword by Samuel T. Gladding

The story of a great American experiment in psychiatry, a revolution in care for those with mental illness, as seen through the example of the Athens Lunatic Asylum built in Southeast Ohio after the Civil War.

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Mariemont · A Pictorial History of a Model Town · By Millard F. Rogers Jr.

Located near Cincinnati, Mariemont was designed as a self-sufficient town, its inspiration derived from the English Garden City and concepts developed in the early twentieth century. In 2007, Mariemont earned National Historic Landmark status from the Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior.

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The AIA Guide to Columbus · By Jeffrey T. Darbee and Nancy A. Recchie

Columbus, the largest city in Ohio, has, since its founding in 1812, been home to many impressive architectural landmarks. The AIA Guide to Columbus, produced by the Columbus Architecture Foundation, highlights the significant buildings and neighborhoods in the Columbus metropolitan area. Skillfully blending architectural interest with historic significance, The AIA Guide to Columbus documents approximately 160 buildings and building groups and is organized geographically.

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Architecture in Cincinnati · An Illustrated History of Designing and Building an American City · By Sue Ann Painter · Photography by Alice Weston

Cincinnati was the first “great” city founded after American independence, and its prodigious growth reflected the rise of the new nation. Its architecture is a testament to that growth and to the importance of the city itself. Architecture in Cincinnati: An Illustrated History of Designing and Building an American City traces the city's development from the first town plans of the 1780s to the city that it is today, renowned for its dramatic architectural achievements.

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American Pantheon · Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol · Edited by Donald R. Kennon and Thomas P. Somma

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals—an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded.

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The Virgin and the Dynamo · Public Murals in American Architecture, 1893–1917 · By Bailey Van Hook

The beaux-arts mural movement in America was fueled by energetic young artists and architects returning from training abroad. They were determined to transform American art and architecture to make them more thematically cosmopolitan and technically fluid and accomplished. The movement slowly coalesced around the decoration of mansions of the Gilded Age elite, mostly in New York, and of public buildings and institutions across the breadth of the country.

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Art and Empire · The Politics of Ethnicity in the United States Capitol, 1815–1860 · By Vivien Green Fryd

The subject matter and iconography of much of the art in the U.S. Capitol forms a remarkably coherent program of the early course of North American empire, from discovery and settlement to the national development and westward expansion that necessitated the subjugation of the indigenous peoples. In Art and Empire, Vivien Green Fryd's revealing cultural and political interpretation of the portraits, reliefs, allegories, and historical paintings commissioned for the U.S.

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The United States Capitol · Designing and Decorating a National Icon · Edited by Donald R. Kennon

The United States Capitol is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American “temple of liberty.”

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The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio · Illustrations, History, Statistics · Edited by Fred W. Bush

Unique and invaluable portrait of a bustling turn–of–the–century community.

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The History and Conservation of Zanzibar Stone Town · By Abdul Sheriff

Zanzibar Stone Town presents the problems of conservation in its most acute forms. Should it be fossilized for the tourists? Or should it grow for the benefit of the inhabitants? Can ways be found to accommodate conflicting social and economic pressures? For its size, Zanzibar, like Venice, occupies a remarkably large romantic space in world imagination. Swahili civilization on these spice islands goes back to the earliest centuries of the Islamic era.

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Build with Adobe · By Marcia Southwick

This practical guide to building adobe homes was written from the author's many years of experience with adobe, and it is refreshingly no-nonsense: “What can you spend?” “Where will you put it?” “Who is going to build it?” This new updated and enlarged edition includes hundreds of photographs, drawings and house plans as well as new information about passive solar heating and cooling, and specific details on construction.

Cover of 'Build with Adobe'


Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850 · By Donald A. Hutslar

Log construction entered the Ohio territory with the seventeenth-century fur traders and mid-eighteenth-century squatters and then spread throughout most of the area after the opening of the territory in the 1780s. Scottish-Irish and German settlers, using techniques from the eastern states and European homelands, found the abundant timber resources of the Ohio country ideally suited to this simple, durable form of construction.

Cover of 'Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850'