Edna Boies Hopkins · Strong in Character, Colorful in Expression · By Dominique H. Vasseur

Edna Boies Hopkins (1872 –1937) is known for her floral woodblock prints that range from Japanese-inspired stylizations to boldly colored and progressively modernist works. In her brief career, Hopkins produced seventy-four known woodblock prints, including figurative work and landscapes as well as floral compositions. This catalogue illustrates all of Hopkins’s known prints, related drawings, and studies.

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Quilts of the Ohio Western Reserve · By Ricky Clark

Quilts of the Ohio Western Reserve includes early quilts brought from Connecticut to the Western Reserve in northeastern Ohio and contemporary quilts, including one by a conservative Amish woman and another inspired by Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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Bringing Modernism Home · Ohio Decorative Arts, 1890–1960 · By Carol Boram-Hays

Ohio enjoys a rich artistic heritage: its inhabitants have made significant contributions in the arts; its schools have produced artists of international acclaim; and its companies have employed progressive manufacturing techniques and pioneering materials in the production of their wares. Ohio's artistic tradition is especially impressive in the area of the decorative arts from the first two-thirds of the twentieth century.

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American Pantheon · Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol · Edited by Donald R. Kennon and Thomas P. Somma

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals—an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded.

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Cincinnati Art-Carved Furniture and Interiors · Edited by Jennifer L. Howe

A remarkable presentation of hand-carved furnishings and woodwork from late-nineteenth-century Cincinnati that reflect the city’s response to the Aesthetic movement.

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The Ceramic Career of M. Louise McLaughlin · By Anita J. Ellis

A tribute to a woman artist who rose to one of the highest positions in her field.

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The Virgin and the Dynamo · Public Murals in American Architecture, 1893–1917 · By Bailey Van Hook

The beaux-arts mural movement in America was fueled by energetic young artists and architects returning from training abroad. They were determined to transform American art and architecture to make them more thematically cosmopolitan and technically fluid and accomplished. The movement slowly coalesced around the decoration of mansions of the Gilded Age elite, mostly in New York, and of public buildings and institutions across the breadth of the country.

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The Cincinnati Wing · The Story of Art in the Queen City · By Julie Aronson

On May 10, 2003, the Cincinnati Art Museum will celebrate the opening of the Cincinnati Wing: eighteen thousand square feet of handsomely renovated gallery space devoted to the museum’s renowned collections of painting, sculpture, furniture, ceramics, and metalwork by Cincinnati artists. The museum is the first in the country to reinterpret its American art collections with a regional emphasis, fostering civic pride and drawing attention to the achievements of the city’s artists.

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Wyeth People · By Gene Logsdon

Wyeth People is the story of one writer's search for the meaning of artistic creativity, approached from personal contact with the work of one of the world's great artists, Andrew Wyeth. In the 1960s, just beginning his career as a writer, Gene Logsdon read a magazine article about Andrew Wyeth in which the artist commented at length on his own creative impulse.

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Ohio Is My Dwelling Place · Schoolgirl Embroideries, 1800–1850 · By Sue Studebaker

One of the most intriguing cultural artifacts of our nation's past was made by young girls—the embroidery sampler. In Ohio Is My Dwelling Place, American decorative arts expert Sue Studebaker documents the samplers created in Ohio prior to 1850, the girls who made them, their families, and the teachers who taught them to stitch.

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American Coverlets and Their Weavers · Coverlets from the Collection of Foster and Muriel McCarl · By Clarita S. Anderson

Coverlets woven in vibrant colors of red, blue, white, and green are as popular today as they were in the nineteenth century. American Coverlets and Their Weavers is a lavishly illustrated guide to one of the premier collections of coverlets in the nation. As such, it is also an essential reference for collectors, historians, specialists in material culture, and others who are interested in American textiles.

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Art and Empire · The Politics of Ethnicity in the United States Capitol, 1815–1860 · By Vivien Green Fryd

The subject matter and iconography of much of the art in the U.S. Capitol forms a remarkably coherent program of the early course of North American empire, from discovery and settlement to the national development and westward expansion that necessitated the subjugation of the indigenous peoples. In Art and Empire, Vivien Green Fryd's revealing cultural and political interpretation of the portraits, reliefs, allegories, and historical paintings commissioned for the U.S.

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Art As Image · Prints and Promotion in Cincinnati, Ohio · Edited by Alice M. Cornell

Illustrates the spectacular technological and artistic developments in the nineteenth-century printing trade from the earliest days of the Old Northwest Territory.

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The United States Capitol · Designing and Decorating a National Icon · Edited by Donald R. Kennon

The United States Capitol is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American “temple of liberty.”

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Catalogue of Photography · The Cleveland Museum of Art · By Tom E. Hinson

Catalogue of the Cleveland Museum of Art’s photographic holdings.

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