For information about submitting your manuscript for the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize, see Hollis Summers Poetry Prize.

Submitting a Proposal

We request that you not submit your complete manuscript unless an editor has invited you to do so.

Your proposal should include a cover letter that includes a narrative description (2-4 typescript pages) of the proposed book's content and scope and an argument for the book's importance, as a rationale for publishing by the Ohio University Press. Why is this book needed? What will it contribute? How does it compare with other literature on the subject? Who is the audience for this book?

Your proposal should also include:

  1. A table of contents
  2. A sample chapter, or two
  3. The anticipated length of the manuscript
  4. The anticipated date of completion (if still a work-in-progress)
  5. An up-to-date copy of your curriculum vitae

Please send submissions to:

Gillian Berchowitz
Director
Ohio University Press
31 S. Court St.
Suite 143
Athens OH 45701

Submitting a Manuscript

If an editor has requested a full manuscript for review, we ask that you adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Submit a hard copy of the manuscript. At the review stage, computer disk copy is not required.
  2. Manuscript copy should be double-spaced, on standard 8½" × 11" paper. Margins should be at least 1" on all sides. Dot matrix print is only acceptable if it is near-letter quality. Text should be unjustified (ragged right margin).
  3. Pages should be consecutively numbered and printed on one side only.
  4. A total word and/or character count for the work should be given. All text, including tables, charts, graphs, and illustrations, should be submitted. Text should include a table of contents, preface or introduction, all chapters, notes, bibliography, appendices or supplementary materials, and any other text to be included in the work.
  5. In general, Ohio University Press follows the stylistic guidelines in the Chicago Manual of Style and asks that authors prepare their manuscripts accordingly.
  6. All explanatory notes should be prepared as endnotes and placed at the end of the text. Ohio University Press does not accept footnotes, typed at the bottom of corresponding pages. Endnotes should also be prepared in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.
  7. Please provide full information about the permissions that have been or will have to be procured for quoted material and/or illustrations.

Guidelines and Checklists for the Submission of a Final Manuscript


New Titles

A Saturnalia of Bunk
Selections from The Free Lance, 1911–1915
H. L. Mencken’s reputation as a journalist and cultural critic of the twentieth century has endured well into the twenty-first. His early contributions as a writer, however, are not very well known. He began his journalistic career as early as 1899 and in 1910 cofounded the Baltimore Evening Sun.


Virginia Hamilton
America’s Storyteller
Long before she wrote The House of Dies Drear, M. C. Higgins, the Great, and many other children’s classics, Virginia Hamilton grew up among her extended family near Yellow Springs, Ohio, where her grandfather had been brought as a baby through the Underground Railroad.


The Riddle of Malnutrition
The Long Arc of Biomedical and Public Health Interventions in Uganda
More than ten million children suffer from severe acute malnutrition globally each year. In Uganda, longstanding efforts to understand, treat, and then prevent the condition initially served to medicalize it, in the eyes of both biomedical personnel and Ugandans who brought their children to the hospital for treatment and care.


Julius Nyerere
With vision, hard-nosed judgment, and biting humor, Julius Nyerere confronted the challenges of nation building in modern Africa. Constructing Tanzania out of a controversial Cold War union between Tanganyika and Zanzibar, Nyerere emerged as one of independent Africa’s most influential leaders.


Waste of Timelessness and Other Early Stories
Written when Anaïs Nin was in her twenties and living in France, the stories collected in Waste of Timelessness contain many elements familiar to those who know her later work as well as revelatory, early clues to themes developed in those more mature stories and novels.