For information about submitting your manuscript for the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize, see Hollis Summers Poetry Prize.

Submitting a Proposal

We request that you not submit your complete manuscript unless an editor has invited you to do so.

Your proposal should include a cover letter that includes a narrative description (2-4 typescript pages) of the proposed book's content and scope and an argument for the book's importance, as a rationale for publishing by the Ohio University Press. Why is this book needed? What will it contribute? How does it compare with other literature on the subject? Who is the audience for this book?

Your proposal should also include:

  1. A table of contents
  2. A sample chapter, or two
  3. The anticipated length of the manuscript
  4. The anticipated date of completion (if still a work-in-progress)
  5. An up-to-date copy of your curriculum vitae

Please send submissions to:

Gillian Berchowitz
Director
Ohio University Press
31 S. Court St.
Suite 143
Athens OH 45701

Submitting a Manuscript

If an editor has requested a full manuscript for review, we ask that you adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Submit a hard copy of the manuscript. At the review stage, computer disk copy is not required.
  2. Manuscript copy should be double-spaced, on standard 8½" × 11" paper. Margins should be at least 1" on all sides. Dot matrix print is only acceptable if it is near-letter quality. Text should be unjustified (ragged right margin).
  3. Pages should be consecutively numbered and printed on one side only.
  4. A total word and/or character count for the work should be given. All text, including tables, charts, graphs, and illustrations, should be submitted. Text should include a table of contents, preface or introduction, all chapters, notes, bibliography, appendices or supplementary materials, and any other text to be included in the work.
  5. In general, Ohio University Press follows the stylistic guidelines in the Chicago Manual of Style and asks that authors prepare their manuscripts accordingly.
  6. All explanatory notes should be prepared as endnotes and placed at the end of the text. Ohio University Press does not accept footnotes, typed at the bottom of corresponding pages. Endnotes should also be prepared in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.
  7. Please provide full information about the permissions that have been or will have to be procured for quoted material and/or illustrations.

Guidelines and Checklists for the Submission of a Final Manuscript


New Titles

From Disarmament to Rearmament
The Reversal of US Policy toward West Germany, 1946–1955
At the end of World War II, the Allies were unanimous in their determination to disarm the former aggressor Germany. As the Cold War intensified, however, the decision whether to reverse that policy and to rearm West Germany led to disagreements both within the U.S. government and among members of the nascent NATO alliance.


The Constant Listener
Henry James and Theodora Bosanquet—An Imagined Memoir
In 1907, in a quiet English village, Theodora Bosanquet answered Henry James’s call for someone to transcribe his edits and additions to his formidable body of work. The aging James had agreed to revise his novels and tales into the twenty-four-volume New York Edition.


The Golden Age of Phenomenology at the New School for Social Research, 1954–1973
These original essays focus on the introduction of phenomenology to the United States by the community of scholars who taught and studied at the New School for Social Research in New York City between 1954 and 1973. The collection powerfully traces the lineage and development of phenomenology in the North American context.


Fifty Must-Try Craft Beers of Ohio
Every craft beer has a story, and part of the fun is learning where the liquid gold in your glass comes from. In Fifty Must-Try Craft Beers of Ohio, veteran beer writer Rick Armon picks the can’t-miss brews in a roundup that will handily guide everyone from the newest beer aficionado to those with the most seasoned palates.


The Man Who Created Paradise
A Fable
The Man Who Created Paradise, a fable inspired by a true story, tells how young Wally Spero looked at one of the bleakest places in America—the strip-mined spoil banks of southeastern Ohio—and saw in it his escape from the drudgery of his factory job.