shopping_cart

Good-Bye to Old Peking
The Wartime Letters of U.S. Marine Captain John Seymour Letcher, 1937–1939

Edited by Katie Letcher Lyle and Roger B. Jeans

For two and a half years (1937-1939), Captain John Seymour Letcher commanded a company of the U.S. Embassy Marine Guard in Peking. During that time, he wrote a series of letters to his parents in Virginia describing the life of a Westerner in the former imperial city. During that same time, China was invaded by Japan.

Captain Letcher describes the flavor of life in pre-Communist China—the food, servants, cold Peking winters and torrid summers, hunting, and excursions to the major tourist sites.

But his letters also tell of the Japanese slaughter of Chinese troops in the opening days of the Sino-Japanese War. He wrote about life in a city under Japanese occupation and the stirring story of the Chinese guerrillas rebounding from devastating defeat.

These letters and accompanying introduction, preface, and notes, draw attention to the Western experience in a place and time largely overlooked by military historians and modern China specialists.

Katie Letcher Lyle is the author of more than a dozen books. She has taught at Southern Seminary College, Hollins University, Washington and Lee University, and Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. She lives with her husband in Lexington, Virginia.

Roger B. Jeans is Elizabeth Lewis Otey Professor of East Asian History at Washington and Lee University. He is the author of Democracy and Socialism in Republican China.

Order a print copy

Hardcover · $36 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $45.00 · Save 20% ($36)

Buy from a local bookstore

IndieBound

US and Canada only

Cover of Good-Bye to Old Peking

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Formats

Hardcover
978-0-8214-1228-2
Retail price: $45.00, S.
Release date: April 1998
210 pages
Rights:  World

Related Titles

Cover of 'Victorian Travelers and the Opening of China 1842-1907'

Victorian Travelers and the Opening of China 1842-1907
By Susan Shoenbauer Thurin

Three men and three women: a plant collector, a merchant and his novelist wife, a military officer, and two famous women travelers went to China between the Opium War and the formal end of the opium trade, 1842-1907. Their range of perspectives, their acquaintance with one another and their similar scope of travel to Hong Kong, the treaty ports, and Sichuan lend intensity to their picture of China and the Western presence there.

Literary Studies · Victorian Studies · British Literature · China · Eastern Asia · Asia · 19th century · Victorian Era

Cover of 'From Submarines to Suburbs'

From Submarines to Suburbs
Selling a Better America, 1939–1959
By Cynthia Lee Henthorn

During World War II, U.S. businesses devised marketing strategies that encouraged consumers to believe their country’s wartime experience would launch a better America. Advertisements and promotional articles celebrated the immense industrial output that corporations achieved during the war.

History · American History · United States · North America · Americas · World War II · 20th century · Cold War · Popular Culture

Cover of 'Hands Across the Sea?'

Hands Across the Sea?
U.S.-Japan Relations, 1961-1981
By Timothy P. Maga

In 1961, the U.S. economy and military remained unassailable in the eyes of the world. Within twenty years, America faced defeat in Vietnam and its economy had been shaken. Japan was now considered the great economic superpower, while the U.S. and Japan reversed roles as surplus and debtor nations. Hands across the Sea? examines this reversal of roles, determining how and why America and Japan became the post-World War II era's most argumentative allies.

Asian Studies · Eastern Asia · Japan · Americas · North America · United States · 20th century · Cold War · Political Science · Asia