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The River Home
A Memoir

By Dorothy Weil

“The river journeys provide an arresting motif for an unusually rich and extremely moving memoir.”

Lee Smith, author of News of the Spirit

“Weil’s account of being a ‘river rat’ is so unusual that it piques our curiosity and adds a different voice and perspective to the memoir genre. The work is universal in the sense that readers, especially women readers of Weil’s generation, have experienced much of the social and cultural changes that Weil undergoes and have coped with these themselves in their own ways.”

Ceil Cleveland, author of Whatever Happened to Jacy Farrow?

The death of her father begins Dorothy Weil’s search for what causes the family’s “spinning of in all directions like the pieces of Chaos.” She embarks on a river odyssey, traveling the Ohio, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers by steamboat, towboat, and even an old-fashioned flatboat. The river brings her family back, as she records the stories of her fellow “river rats”: steamboat veterans, deckhands, captains, and cooks.

The River Home takes the reader into a world few ever glimpse, that of America’s riverboats. In the fast-paced narrative, with incisive characterizations and dialogue, the author introduces us to this vivid milieu and a gallery of fascinating people. We meet her father, a “wild river man from the Kentucky hills,” her mother, “a proper girl from a Cincinnati Dutch clan,” and her brother, a fourth-generation river man, as well as the artists and academics she meets in her adult life.

Weil’s voice is clear and wry, as well as poetic, bringing out both the sadness and joys of a family torn by mismatched backgrounds. Her themes speak to all: the confusion brought by family conflict, the strength of family love no matter how troubled the relationships, the mortality we all face, the importance of where we come from and where we go.

Dorothy Weil is a feature writer, novelist, poet, and a producer with TV Image, Inc., a video production team whose documentaries about the Ohio River have won many national awards. She lives in Cincinnati with her husband and paints whenever possible in a studio above a neighborhood bar.

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Hardcover
978-0-8214-1405-7
Retail price: $28.95, S.
Release date: April 2002
288 pages · 5½ × 8½ in.
Rights:  World

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