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Reworlding America
Myth, History, and Narrative

By John Muthyala

“Muthyala reimagines the literatures of Americas in the transborder and hemispheric dimension.”

Donald E. Pease, coeditor of The Future of American Studies

“(Reworlding America) is admirable in its expansive historico-cultural scope and in its ambitious attempt to bring together a vast array of theoretical currents in recent transnational and postcolonial scholarship.”

H-Amstdy

John Muthyala's Reworlding America moves beyond the U.S.-centered approach of traditional American literary criticism. In this groundbreaking book, Muthyala argues for a transgeographical perspective from which to study the literary and cultural histories of the Americas.

By emphasizing transnational migration, border crossing, and colonial modernity, Reworlding America exposes how national, ethnic, linguistic, religious, and cultural boundaries have been continually created and transgressed—with profound consequences for the peoples of the Americas.

Drawing from cultural studies, anthropology, literature, and history, Muthyala examines the literatures of the Americas in terms of their intimate relationship to questions of cultural survival, identity formation, and social power. He goes beyond nationalist, ethnocentric, and religious frameworks used to conceptualize American literary history and examines the connection between modernity and colonialism.

Reworlding America's significance extends into the realm of education, history, ethnography, and literary and cultural studies and contributes to the larger project of refashioning the role of English and American studies in a transborder, postnational global culture.

John Muthyala is a professor of English at the University of Southern Maine.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Reworlding America
  • Chapter 2: Frontier Narratives of the Americas
  • Chapter 3: Pan-Caribbean Hemispheric Poetics
  • Chapter 4: Border Cultures in the Borderlands
  • Acknowledgments
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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Hardcover
978-0-8214-1675-4
Retail price: $39.95, S.
Release date: April 2006
232 pages · 5½ × 8½ in.
Rights:  World

Electronic
978-0-8214-4215-9
Release date: April 2006
232 pages
Rights:  World

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