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Angelic Airs, Subversive Songs
Music as Social Discourse in the Victorian Novel

By Alisa Clapp-Itnyre

“Clapp-Itnyre’s interdisciplinary approach in this book cogently demonstrates how the aesthetic subject of music functions as a lens for social debates of the day. By providing historical and cultural contexts for musical genres and performances, Clapp-Itnyre enriches our understanding of the works of Gaskell, Eliot, and Hardy and of Victorian musical debates themselves.”

Laura Vorachek, Victorians Institute Journal

Music was at once one of the most idealized and one of the most contested art forms of the Victorian period. Yet this vitally important nineteenth-century cultural form has been studied by literary critics mainly as a system of thematic motifs. Angelic Airs, Subversive Songs positions music as a charged site of cultural struggle, promoted concurrently as a transcendent corrective to social ills and as a subversive cause of those ills. Alisa Clapp-Itnyre examines Victorian constructions of music to advance patriotism, Christianity, culture, and domestic harmony, and suggests that often these goals were undermined by political tensions in song texts or “immoral sensuality” in the “spectacle” of live music-making.

Professor Clapp-Itnyre turns her focus to the novels of Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy, who present complex engagements with those musical genres most privileged by Victorian society: folk songs, religious hymns, and concert music.

Angelic Airs, Subversive Songs recovers the pervasive ambiguities of the Victorian musical period, ambiguities typically overlooked by both literary scholars and musicologists. To the literary critic and cultural historian, Professor Clapp-Itnyre demonstrates the necessity of further exploring the complete aesthetic climate behind some of the Victorian period’s most powerful literary works. And to the feminist scholar and the musicologist, Clapp-Itnyre reveals the complexities of music as both an oppressive cultural force and an expressive, creative outlet for women.

Alisa Clapp-Itnyre is an assistant professor of English at Indiana University East in Richmond, Indiana, and has published articles in several journals and edited collections.

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Hardcover
978-0-8214-1431-6
Retail price: $49.95, S.
Release date: December 2002
272 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

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