shopping_cart

Framing Shakespeare on Film
How the Frame Reveals Meaning

By Kathy M. Howlett

The aesthetics of frame theory form the basis of Framing Shakespeare on Film. This groundbreaking work expands on the discussion of film constructivists in its claim that the spectacle of Shakespeare on film is a problem-solving activity.

Kathy Howlett demonstrates convincingly how viewers' expectations for understanding Shakespeare on film can be manipulated by the director's cinematic technique. Emphasizing that the successful film can transform Shakespeare's text while remaining rooted in Shakespearean conceptions, Howlett raises the question of how directors and audiences understand the genre of Shakespeare on film and reveals how the medium alters the patterns through which the audience views Shakespeare.

Kathy M. Howlett has taught Shakespeare at Northeastern University and is the author of articles on Shakespeare, film, and Aphra Behn.   More info →

Order a print copy

Hardcover · $31.96 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $39.95 · Save 20% ($31.96)

Buy from a local bookstore

IndieBound

US and Canada only

Cover of Framing Shakespeare on Film

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Formats

Hardcover
978-0-8214-1247-3
Retail price: $39.95, S.
Release date: May 2000
256 pages
Rights:  World

Electronic
978-0-8214-4075-9
Release date: May 2000
256 pages
Rights:  World

Related Titles

Cover of 'Shakespeare in Production'

Shakespeare in Production
Whose History?
By H. R. Coursen

Shakespeare in Production examines a number of plays in context. Included are the 1936 Romeo and Juliet, unpopular with critics of filmed Shakespeare, but very much a “photoplay” if its time; the opening sequences of filmed Hamlets which span more than seventy years; The Comedy of Errors on television, where production of this script is almost impossible; and the Branagh Much Ado About Nothing, a “popular” film discussed in the context of comedy as a genre.

Film and Video - History and Criticism · Media Studies · Literary Studies · Shakespeare · British Literature · Literary Criticism · Theater - History and Criticism

Cover of 'Directing Shakespeare'

Directing Shakespeare
A Scholar Onstage
By Sidney Homan

An impossible question from a Chinese actor—“Why is Shakespeare eternal?”—drove Sidney Homan after fifty years in the theater to ponder just what makes Shakespeare...well, Shakespeare. The result, Directing Shakespeare, reflects the two worlds in which Homan operates—as a scholar and teacher on campus, and as a director and actor in professional and university theaters.

Education · Literary Studies · Shakespeare · Theater - History and Criticism

Cover of 'Shakespeare at the Cineplex'

Shakespeare at the Cineplex
The Kenneth Branagh Era
By Samuel Crowl

Samuel Crowl's Shakespeare at the Cineplex: The Kenneth Branagh Era is the first thorough exploration of the fifteen major Shakespeare films released since the surprising success of Kenneth Branagh's Henry V (1989). Crowl presents the rich variety of these films in the “long decade: between the fall of the Berlin Wall and the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.”

Film and Video - History and Criticism · Media Studies · Literary Studies · Shakespeare · Theater - History and Criticism · British Literature