shopping_cart

Living with Nkrumahism
Nation, State, and Pan-Africanism in Ghana

By Jeffrey S. Ahlman

“The time is ripe for histories like this one that re-examine the classic moment of early postcolonial nationalism. In clear, accessible style, Ahlman sets up this account as a story that needs to be told without the baggage of a later postcolonial pessimism overdetermining the narrative. Further, he meets this challenge.”

Andrew Ivaska, author of Cultured States: Youth, Gender, and Modern Style in 1960s Dar es Salaam

In the 1950s, Ghana, under the leadership of Kwame Nkrumah and the Convention People’s Party, drew the world’s attention as anticolonial activists, intellectuals, and politicians looked to it as a model for Africa’s postcolonial future. Nkrumah was a visionary, a statesman, and one of the key makers of contemporary Africa. In Living with Nkrumahism, Jeffrey S. Ahlman reexamines the infrastructure that organized and consolidated Nkrumah’s philosophy into a political program.

Ahlman draws on newly available source material to portray an organizational and cultural history of Nkrumahism. Taking us inside bureaucracies, offices, salary structures, and working routines, he painstakingly reconstructs the political and social milieu of the time and portrays a range of Ghanaians’ relationships to their country’s unique position in the decolonization process. Through fine attunement to the nuances of statecraft, he demonstrates how political and philosophical ideas shape lived experience.

Living with Nkrumahism stands at the crossroads of the rapidly growing fields of African decolonization, postcolonial history, and Cold War studies. It provides a much-needed scholarly model through which to reflect on the changing nature of citizenship and political and social participation in Africa and the broader postcolonial world.

Jeffrey S. Ahlman is an assistant professor of history at Smith College. His work has appeared in the Journal of African History, Africa Today, Kronos, Ghana Studies, and elsewhere.   More info →

Order a print copy

Paperback · $26.36 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $32.95 · Save 20% ($26.36)

Hardcover · $64 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $80.00 · Save 20% ($64)

Buy from a local bookstore

IndieBound

US and Canada only

Download an electronic copy

Amazon Kindle Store Barnes & Noble NOOK Google Play iBooks Store

Availability and price vary according to vendor.

Cover of Living with Nkrumahism

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Formats

Paperback
978-0-8214-2293-9
Retail price: $32.95, S.
Release date: October 2017
5 illus. · 322 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

Hardcover
978-0-8214-2292-2
Retail price: $80.00, S.
Release date: October 2017
5 illus. · 322 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

Electronic
978-0-8214-4615-7
Release date: October 2017
5 illus. · 322 pages
Rights:  World

Related Titles

Cover of 'Making a World after Empire'

Making a World after Empire
The Bandung Moment and Its Political Afterlives
Edited by Christopher J. Lee

In April 1955, twenty-nine countries from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East came together for a diplomatic conference in Bandung, Indonesia, intending to define the direction of the postcolonial world.

World History · Colonialism and Decolonization · 20th century · Global Issues

Cover of 'Frantz Fanon'

Frantz Fanon
Toward a Revolutionary Humanism
By Christopher J. Lee

A timely and original short biography reintroducing Fanon for a new generation of readers. Written with clarity and passion, Christopher J. Lee’s account argues for the pragmatic idealism of Frantz Fanon and his continued importance today.

Biography, Activists · Colonialism and Decolonization · World History · African Studies

Cover of 'Cold War and Decolonization in Guinea, 1946–1958'

Cold War and Decolonization in Guinea, 1946–1958
By Elizabeth Schmidt

In September 1958, Guinea claimed its independence, rejecting a constitution that would have relegated it to junior partnership in the French Community. In all the French empire, Guinea was the only territory to vote “No.” Orchestrating the “No” vote was the Guinean branch of the Rassemblement Démocratique Africain (RDA), an alliance of political parties with affiliates in French West and Equatorial Africa and the United Nations trusts of Togo and Cameroon.

African History · Colonialism and Decolonization · Nationalism · 20th century · Cold War · African Studies · Guinea

Cover of 'Market Encounters'

Market Encounters
Consumer Cultures in Twentieth-Century Ghana
By Bianca Murillo

By emphasizing the centrality of human relationships to Ghana’s economic past, Murillo introduces a radical rethinking of consumption studies from an Africa-centered perspective. The result is a keen look at colonial capitalism in all of its intricacies, legacies, and contradictions, including its entanglement with gender and race.

African History · Popular Culture · 20th century · Social History · African Studies · Ghana · Western Africa