shopping_cart

Paying Calls in Shangri-La
Scenes from a Woman’s Life in American Diplomacy

By Judith M. Heimann

Published in association with ADST-DACOR Diplomats and Diplomacy Series

“A unique look into Foreign Service life…[and] an exciting and educational read, particularly for anyone interested in a diplomatic career.”

Foreign Service Journal

“A marvelous view of a profession where the unexpected is the rule. This is real, sometimes funny, sometimes tragic, but always lively.”

Baron Frans van Daele, chief of staff to the Belgian king and former Belgian ambassador to the United States

“This is a wonderful memoir about Foreign Service life abroad and the author’s transition from Foreign Service wife to Foreign Service officer. She demonstrates how, by being out and about in the host country, you can sometimes be in the right place at the right time. For example, she shows how, with the wit and language to take advantage of a banal museum opening, it was possible to learn Soviet plans for East Germany from a firsthand source the day after the Wall fell.”

Phyllis Oakley, first Department of State spokeswoman and an early tandem diplomat

Judith M. Heimann entered the diplomatic life in 1958 to join her husband, John, in Jakarta, Indonesia, at his American Embassy post. This, her first time out of the United States, would set her on a path across the continents as she mastered the fine points of diplomatic culture. She did so first as a spouse, then as a diplomat herself, thus becoming part of one of the Foreign Service’s first tandem couples.

Heimann’s lively recollections of her life in Africa, Asia, and Europe show us that when it comes to reconciling our government’s requirements with the other government’s wants, shuttle diplomacy, Skype, and email cannot match on-the-ground interaction. The ability to gauge and finesse gesture, tone of voice, and unspoken assumptions became her stock-in-trade as she navigated, time and again, remarkably delicate situations.

This insightful and witty memoir gives us a behind-the-scenes look at a rarely explored experience: that of one of the very first married female diplomats, who played an unsung but significant role in some of the important international events of the past fifty years. To those who know something of today’s world of diplomacy, Paying Calls in Shangri-La will be an enlightening tour through the way it used to be—and for aspiring Foreign Service officers and students, it will be an inspiration.

Judith M. Heimann has spent most of her life involved with American diplomacy. She has written widely on Southeast Asia and the Pacific. She is the author of The Most Offending Soul Alive and The Airmen and the Headhunters, and coauthor of the award-winning PBS documentary based on the latter.

Order a print copy

Paperback · $21.56 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $26.95 · Save 20% ($21.56)

Hardcover · $44 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $55.00 · Save 20% ($44)

Buy from a local bookstore

IndieBound

US and Canada only

Download an electronic copy

Amazon Kindle Store Barnes & Noble NOOK Google Play iBooks Store

Availability and price vary according to vendor.

Cover of Paying Calls in Shangri-La

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Formats

Paperback
978-0-8214-2233-5
Retail price: $26.95, T.
Release date: September 2016
22 illus. · 246 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

Hardcover
978-0-8214-2232-8
Retail price: $55.00, S.
Release date: September 2016
22 illus. · 246 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

Electronic
978-0-8214-4578-5
Release date: September 2016
22 illus. · 246 pages
Rights:  World

Related Titles

Cover of 'A Woman of the Times'

A Woman of the Times
Journalism, Feminism, and the Career of Charlotte Curtis
By Marilyn S. Greenwald
· Foreword by Liz Smith

How a woman reporter from Columbus, Ohio, broke into the ranks of the male-dominated upper echelon at the New York Times.

Biography, Women · Biography, Journalists · Women’s Studies

Cover of 'On the Fringes of History'

On the Fringes of History
A Memoir
By Philip D. Curtin

In the 1950s, professional historians claiming to specialize in tropical Africa were no more than a handful. The teaching of world history was confined to high school courses, and even those were focused on European history, with a chapter added to account for the history of East and South Asia. The change over the ensuing decades was revolutionary. Philip D. Curtin was a leader among a new generation of historians that emerged after the Second World War.

African Studies · Literary Studies · Biography · Memoir · African History · History

Cover of 'Paper Sons and Daughters'

Paper Sons and Daughters
Growing up Chinese in South Africa
By Ufrieda Ho

Ufrieda Ho’s compelling memoir describes with intimate detail what it was like to come of age in the marginalized Chinese community of Johannesburg during the apartheid era of the 1970s and 1980s. The Chinese were mostly ignored, as Ho describes it, relegated to certain neighborhoods and certain jobs, living in a kind of gray zone between the blacks and the whites. As long as they adhered to these rules, they were left alone.

African Authors · African Studies · South Africa · Women Authors · Fiction

Cover of 'Modern Muslims'

Modern Muslims
A Sudan Memoir
By Steve Howard

Steve Howard departed for the Sudan in the early 1980s as an American graduate student beginning a three-year journey in which he would join and live with the Republican Brotherhood, the Sufi Muslim group led by the visionary Mahmoud Mohamed Taha. Taha was a religious intellectual who participated in the early days of Sudan’s anticolonial struggle, but quickly turned his movement into a religious reform effort based on his radical reading of the Qur’an. He was executed in 1985 for apostasy.

Memoir · African History · Sufism · 20th century · Islam · African Studies · Sudan