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Limits to Liberation after Apartheid
Citizenship, Governance, & Culture

Edited by Steven L. Robins

Postapartheid South Africa struggles with race tensions, social inequalities, and unemployment that are contributing to widespread crises. In addressing the transition to democracy, Limits to Liberation After Apartheid examines issues of culture and identity, drawing attention to the creative agency of citizens of the “new” South Africa. The writers question the classical western model of citizenship and procedural democracy in the face of the inability of many African states to provide basic needs. Their bold, interdisciplinary inquiry contributes to South African and international scholarship on urban planning, governance, and citizenship.

Steven L. Robins is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at the University of Stellenbosch.   More info →

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African Studies · Political Science

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Paperback
978-0-8214-1666-2
Retail price: $32.95, S.
Release date: October 2005
320 pages · 5¼ × 8½ in.
Rights: World (exclusive in Americas, and Philippines) except British Commonwealth, Continental Europe, and United Kingdom

Hardcover
978-0-8214-1665-5
Retail price: $59.95, S.
Release date: October 2005
320 pages · 5¼ × 8½ in.
Rights: World (exclusive in Americas, and Philippines) except British Commonwealth, Continental Europe, and United Kingdom

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