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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Internships

Guidelines for Editorial Department Internship (English 491)

The editorial department intern will assist in the preparation of book manuscripts at the Ohio University Press, a not-for-profit scholarly press publishing academic and trade books. This position will expose the intern to a variety of tasks commonly expected of an entry-level editorial assistant in a scholarly or trade publishing house.

Candidates will be required to take and pass a keyboarding and proofreading test. The position requires meticulous attention to detail as well as a good command of English grammar and spelling. Macintosh computer skills and experience with Microsoft Word are helpful.

Because of the extensive training involved, this internship is offered with the expectation that the intern will work no fewer than ten hours per week and that the internship will continue for a minimum of two consecutive quarters. Extension of the internship for additional hours or additional quarters will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The work covered by the internship will include as many of the following elements as time allows:

  1. Cleanup of manuscripts (preparation of manuscripts for the copyeditor, removal of extraneous formatting, application of Microsoft Word Styles);
  2. Entry of corrections (keying in author’s revisions from hard copy);
  3. Attendance at launch meeting(s);
  4. Filing CIP data application(s) with the Library of Congress;
  5. Checking permissions and images;
  6. Proofreading transcriptions against original documents;
  7. Proofreading jacket/cover copy, catalogue copy, advertising copy, and/or page proofs;
  8. Filing, photocopying, and general office work.

Interns will not have the opportunity to edit manuscripts.

This internship provides invaluable professional experience for students considering a career in publishing. For more information or to schedule a testing session, please contact Managing Editor Nancy Basmajian at (740) 593-1161 or basmajia@ohio.edu.

New Titles

Colonial Fantasies, Imperial Realities
Race Science and the Making of Polishness on the Fringes of the German Empire, 1840–1920
Ureña Valerio illuminates nested imperial and colonial relations using sources ranging from medical texts and state documents to travel literature and fiction. She analyzes scientific and medical debates to connect medicine, migration, and colonialism, providing an invigorating model for the analysis of Polish history from a global perspective.

Rust Belt Burlesque
The Softer Side of a Heavy Metal Town
Rust Belt Burlesque traces the history of burlesque in Cleveland from the 1800s to the present, while also telling the story of Bella Sin, a Mexican immigrant who largely drove Northeast Ohio’s burlesque comeback. Over 100 color photos provide a peek into the raucous Ohio Burlesque Festival that packs the Beachland Ballroom every year.

Age of Concrete
Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique
Age of Concrete is about people building homes on tenuous ground in the outer neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique, places thought of simply as slums. But up close, they are an archive: houses of reeds, wood, zinc, and concrete embodying the ambitions of people who built their own largest investment and greatest bequest to the future.

Children’s Literature in Hitler’s Germany
The Cultural Policy of National Socialism
Kamenetsky shows how Nazis used children’s literature to shape a “Nordic Germanic” worldview, intended to strengthen the German folk community, the Führer, and the fatherland by imposing a racial perspective on mankind. Their thus corroded the last remnants of the Weimar Republic’s liberal education, while promoting a following for Hitler.

Children of Hope
The Odyssey of the Oromo Slaves from Ethiopia to South Africa
In Children of Hope, Sandra Rowoldt Shell details the life histories of sixty-four Oromo children who were enslaved in Ethiopia in the late nineteenth century, liberated by the British navy, and ultimately sent to a Free Church of Scotland mission in South Africa, where their stories were recorded through a series of interviews.