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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

New African Histories

The New African Histories series builds on the significant achievements of social historians over the past two decades, while pushing the boundaries of African social history in exciting new directions - theoretically, methodologically and conceptually.

The series promotes continued research on the lived experiences of Africans in their households, communities, workplaces, and classes, as well as in the clubs, associations, and social movements they have created. It insists on the centrality of gender, generation and social identity to African historiography, while it seeks to expose the constraints at local, national, and transnational levels that structure the daily lives of the poor and disadvantaged.

Social historians have long maintained that there can be no social history without economic history. We contend that it is increasingly imperative that politics, environment, and culture receive far greater attention in the exploration of daily life.

Editors


Jean Allman, Series Editor
Professor of African and African American Studies
Washington University in St. Louis
Center for the Humanities
208 Umrath
St. Louis, MO 63130

Allen Isaacman, Series Editor
Professor of History
University of Minnesota
267 Nineteenth Ave. South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Derek R. Peterson, Series Editor
Professor of History and African Studies
University of Michigan
1029 Tisch Hall
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Cover of 'The Great Upheaval'

The Great Upheaval
Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria
By Judith A. Byfield

In this finely textured social and intellectual history of gender and nation-making, Byfield captures the dynamism of women’s political activism in postwar Nigeria. She illuminates the centrality of gender to the study of nationalism, thus offering new lines of inquiry into the late colonial era and its consequences for the future Nigerian state.

African History · Women’s History · Women’s Studies · Nationalism · Nigeria · African Studies

Cover of 'Seeing Like a Citizen'

Seeing Like a Citizen
Decolonization, Development, and the Making of Kenya, 1945–1980
By Kara Moskowitz

In focusing on rural Kenyans as they actively sought access to aid, Moskowitz offers new insights into the texture of political life in the decolonizing and early postcolonial world. Her account complicates our understanding of Kenyan experiences of independence, and the meaning and form of development.

African History · Economic Development · Colonialism and Decolonization · Kenya · African Studies

Cover of 'The Politics of Disease Control'

The Politics of Disease Control
Sleeping Sickness in Eastern Africa, 1890–1920
By Mari K. Webel

Situating sleeping sickness control within African intellectual worlds and political dynamics, Webel prioritizes local histories to understand the successes and failures of a widely used colonial public health intervention—the sleeping sickness camp—in dialogue with African strategies to mitigate illness and death in the past.

African History · History of Science · African Studies · Eastern Africa · Human Geography

Cover of 'Ambivalent'

Ambivalent
Photography and Visibility in African History
Edited by Patricia Hayes and Gary Minkley

Ambivalent makes photography into an engaging and important subject of historical investigation. Contributors bring photography into conversation with orality, travel writing, ritual, psychoanalysis, and politics, with new approaches to questions of race, time, and postcolonial and decolonial histories.

African History · Art Criticism and Theory · Africa · Photography Criticism

Cover of 'Emergent Masculinities'

Emergent Masculinities
Gendered Power and Social Change in the Biafran Atlantic Age
By Ndubueze L. Mbah

Atlanticization—or interaction between regional processes and Atlantic forces such as the slave trade and Christianization—from 1750 to 1920 transformed gender into a primary mode of social differentiation in the Bight of Biafra. Mbah examines this process to fill a major gap in our understanding of gender’s role in precolonial Africa.

African History · Gender Studies · African Studies · Igbo · Slavery and Slave Trade · Western Africa · Atlantic Studies

Cover of 'Powerful Frequencies'

Powerful Frequencies
Radio, State Power, and the Cold War in Angola, 1931–2002
By Marissa J. Moorman

Radio technology and broadcasting played a central role in the formation of colonial Portuguese Southern Africa and the postcolonial nation-state, Angola. Moorman details how settlers, the colonial state, African nationalists, and the postcolonial state all used radio to project power, while the latter employed it to challenge empire.

African History · Media Studies · Angola · African Studies

Cover of 'Age of Concrete'

Age of Concrete
Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique
By David Morton

Age of Concrete is about people building homes on tenuous ground in the outer neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique, places thought of simply as slums. But up close, they are an archive: houses of reeds, wood, zinc, and concrete embodying the ambitions of people who built their own largest investment and greatest bequest to the future.

African History · Human Geography · Urban History · Mozambique · African Studies · Urban Planning

Cover of 'Water Brings No Harm'

Water Brings No Harm
Management Knowledge and the Struggle for the Waters of Kilimanjaro
By Matthew V. Bender

Water Brings No Harm explores the history of community water management on Mount Kilimanjaro. Using the concept of waterscapes—describing how people “see” water and how physical resources intersect with beliefs, needs, and expectations—Bender argues that water conflicts should be understood as struggles between competing forms of knowledge.

Environmental History · African History · Tanzania · World and Comparative History