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Series in Continental Thought

The Series in Continental Thought publishes scholarship that critically engages and extends twentieth- and twenty-first-century European thought, especially phenomenology. The series provides a forum for innovative interpretations of influential figures within this tradition, such as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Levinas, and Derrida. In addition, the series publishes contemporary work in phenomenology that enters into dialogue with other philosophical traditions and fields, including cognitive science, moral psychology, feminism, theory of race, and environmental studies. The publication of translations of influential texts further supports work in both the history of phenomenology and contemporary phenomenology. Published in collaboration with the Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology, the series is committed to the development of Continental philosophy and the work of emerging scholars.

Editors

Dr. Hanne Jacobs
Department of Philosophy
Loyola University Chicago
Crown Center
1032 W. Sheridan Road,
Chicago, IL 60660
hjacobs@luc.edu

Cover of 'The Birth of Sense'

The Birth of Sense
Generative Passivity in Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy
By Don Beith

Don Beith proposes a new concept of “generative passivity,” the idea that our organic, psychological, and social activities take time to develop into sense. Drawing on empirical studies and phenomenological reflections, he argues that in nature, novel meaning emerges prior to any type of constituting activity or deterministic plan.

Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty'

Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty
By Judith Wambacq

Questioning the dominant view that Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty have little of substance in common, Judith Wambacq draws on unpublished primary sources and current scholarship in English and French to bring them into a compelling dialogue to reveal a shared concern with the transcendental conditions of thought.

Continental Philosophy · Phenomenology

Cover of 'The Golden Age of Phenomenology at the New School for Social Research, 1954–1973'

The Golden Age of Phenomenology at the New School for Social Research, 1954–1973
Edited by Lester Embree and Michael D. Barber

These original essays focus on the introduction of phenomenology to the United States by the community of scholars who taught and studied at the New School for Social Research in New York City between 1954 and 1973. The collection powerfully traces the lineage and development of phenomenology in the North American context.

Phenomenology

Cover of 'The Crisis of Meaning and the Life-World'

The Crisis of Meaning and the Life-World
Husserl, Heidegger, Arendt, Patočka
By Ľubica Učník

Učník examines the existential conflict that formed the focus of Edmund Husserl’s final work: how to reconcile scientific rationality with the meaning of human existence. To investigate this conundrum, she places Husserl in dialogue with three of his most important successors: Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, and Jan Patočka.

Continental Philosophy · Phenomenology

Cover of 'Merleau-Ponty'

Merleau-Ponty
Space, Place, Architecture
Edited by Patricia M. Locke and Rachel McCann

Phenomenology has played a decisive role in the emergence of the discourse of place, and the contribution of Merleau-Ponty to architectural theory and practice is well established. This collection of essays by 12 eminent scholars is the first devoted specifically to developing his contribution to our understanding of place and architecture.

Phenomenology · Art Criticism and Theory · Aesthetics

Cover of 'Time, Memory, Institution'

Time, Memory, Institution
Merleau-Ponty’s New Ontology of Self
Edited by David Morris and Kym Maclaren

This is the first investigation of the relation between time and memory in Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s thought as a whole and the first to explore in depth the significance of his concept of institution. It brings his views on the self and ontology into contemporary focus, arguing that the self is not a self-contained or self-determining identity.

Aesthetics · Phenomenology · Philosophy

Cover of 'From Mastery to Mystery'

From Mastery to Mystery
A Phenomenological Foundation for an Environmental Ethic
By Bryan E. Bannon

From Mastery to Mystery is an original and provocative contribution to the burgeoning field of ecophenomenology. Informed by current debates in environmental philosophy, Bannon critiques the conception of nature as “substance” that he finds tacitly assumed by the major environmental theorists.

Continental Philosophy · Environmental Studies

Cover of 'Nature’s Suit'

Nature’s Suit
Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences
By Lee Hardy

Edmund Husserl, founder of the phenomenological movement, is usually read as an idealist in his metaphysics and an instrumentalist in his philosophy of science. In Nature’s Suit, Lee Hardy argues that both views represent a serious misreading of Husserl’s texts.

Philosophy · Phenomenology · Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'The Madness of Vision'

The Madness of Vision
On Baroque Aesthetics
By Christine Buci-Glucksmann
· Translation by Dorothy Z. Baker

Christine Buci-Glucksmann’s The Madness of Vision is one of the most influential studies in phenomenological aesthetics of the baroque. Integrating the work of Merleau-Ponty with Lacanian psychoanalysis, Renaissance studies in optics, and twentieth-century mathematics, the author asserts the materiality of the body and world in her aesthetic theory. All vision is embodied vision, with the body and the emotions continually at play on the visual field.

Continental Philosophy · Philosophy · Aesthetics

Cover of 'The Ontology of Becoming and the Ethics of Particularity'

The Ontology of Becoming and the Ethics of Particularity
By M. C. Dillon
· Edited by Lawrence Hass

M. C. Dillon (1938–2005) was widely regarded as a world-leading Merleau-Ponty scholar. His book Merleau-Ponty’s Ontology (1988) is recognized as a classic text that revolutionized the philosophical conversation about the great French phenomenologist. Dillon followed that book with two others: Semiological Reductionism, a critique of early-1990s linguistic reductionism, and Beyond Romance, a richly developed theory of love.

Philosophy · Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism'

The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism
By Dimitri Ginev

In The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism, Dimitri Ginev draws on developments in hermeneutic phenomenology and other programs in hermeneutic philosophy to inform an interpretative approach to scientific practices. At stake is the question of whether it is possible to integrate forms of reflection upon the ontological difference in the cognitive structure of scientific research. A positive answer would have implied a proof that (pace Heidegger) “science is able to think.”

Philosophy · Continental Philosophy · Phenomenology

Cover of 'The Memory of Place'

The Memory of Place
A Phenomenology of the Uncanny
By Dylan Trigg

From the frozen landscapes of the Antarctic to the haunted houses of childhood, the memory of places we experience is fundamental to a sense of self. Drawing on influences as diverse as Merleau-Ponty, Freud, and J. G. Ballard, The Memory of Place charts the memorial landscape that is written into the body and its experience of the world.

Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'Transversal Rationality and Intercultural Texts'

Transversal Rationality and Intercultural Texts
Essays in Phenomenology and Comparative Philosophy
By Hwa Yol Jung

Transversality is the keyword that permeates the spirit of these thirteen essays spanning almost half a century, from 1965 to 2009. The essays are exploratory and experimental in nature and are meant to be a transversal linkage between phenomenology and East Asian philosophy. Transversality is the concept that dispels all ethnocentrisms, including Eurocentrism.

Philosophy · Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'The Intentional Spectrum and Intersubjectivity'

The Intentional Spectrum and Intersubjectivity
Phenomenology and the Pittsburgh Neo-Hegelians
By Michael D. Barber

World-renowned analytic philosophers John McDowell and Robert Brandom, dubbed “Pittsburgh Neo-Hegelians,” recently engaged in an intriguing debate about perception. In The Intentional Spectrum and Intersubjectivity Michael D. Barber is the first to bring phenomenology to bear not just on the perspectives of McDowell or Brandom alone, but on their intersection.

Philosophy · Continental Philosophy

Cover of 'Dead Letters to Nietzsche, or the Necromantic Art of Reading Philosophy'

Dead Letters to Nietzsche, or the Necromantic Art of Reading Philosophy
By Joanne Faulkner

Dead Letters to Nietzsche examines how writing shapes subjectivity through the example of Nietzsche’s reception by his readers, including Stanley Rosen, David Farrell Krell, Georges Bataille, Laurence Lampert, Pierre Klossowski, and Sarah Kofman. More precisely, Joanne Faulkner finds that the personal identification that these readers form with Nietzsche’s texts is an enactment of the kind of identity-formation described in Lacanian and Kleinian psychoanalysis.

Continental Philosophy · Philosophy