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American History

American History Book List

Cover of 'Argentina, the United States, and the Anti-Communist Crusade in Central America, 1977–1984'

Argentina, the United States, and the Anti-Communist Crusade in Central America, 1977–1984
By Ariel Armony
· Foreword by Thomas W. Walker

Ariel Armony focuses, in this study, on the role played by Argentina in the anti–Communist crusade in Central America. This systematic examination of Argentina’s involvement in the Central American drama of the late 1970s and early 1980s fine–tunes our knowledge of a major episode of the Cold War era. Basing his study on exhaustive research in the United States, Argentina, and Nicaragua, Armony adroitly demolishes several key assumptions that have shaped the work of scholars in U.S.

Cover of 'Lionel Sotheby’s Great War'

Lionel Sotheby’s Great War
Diaries and Letters from the Western Front
By Lionel Sotheby
· Edited by Donald C. Richter
· Introduction by Donald C. Richter
· Foreword by Peter H. Liddle

The “butterfly” that emerged in World War I trench warfare in 1915 aspired to kill: “I cannot explain,” the diary continues. “It comes unseen and makes you oblivious of almost everything at times, save one intense desire to kill, kill, kill, the Germans.” Lionel Sotheby’s diary and letters are a compelling first-person account of the harrowing experiences of the young British lieutenant at the Western Front. His writing reveals constant peril, hourly discomfort, and gruesome injuries.

Cover of 'Making of Legends'

Making of Legends
More True Stories of Frontier America
By Mark Dugan

Some of the American West’s grandest legends are about people who in reality were remorseless killers, robbers, and bandits. These outlaws flourished during the 1800s and gained notoriety throughout the following century. How did their fame persist, and what has inspired the publishing, movie, and television industries to recreate their fictionalized careers over and over again? Mark Dugan brings reality to the forefront in The Making of Legends.

Cover of 'The Golden Dream'

The Golden Dream
Seekers of El Dorado
By Robert Silverberg

One of the most persistent legends in the annals of New World exploration is that of the Land of God. Its mythical site was located over vast areas of South American (and later, North America); it drove some men mad with greed and, often as not, to their deaths. In this amazing history of quest and adventure, Robert Silverberg traces the fate of Old World explorers lured westward by the myth of El Dorado.

Cover of 'The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio'

The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio
Illustrations, History, Statistics
Edited by Fred W. Bush

Unique and invaluable portrait of a bustling turn–of–the–century community.

Cover of 'Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats'

Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats
By Edward A. Mueller

As a Wisconsin historical marker explains: “After 1837 the vast timber resources of northern Wisconsin were eagerly sought by settlers moving into the mid-Mississippi valley. By 1847 there were more than thirty saw-mills on the Wisconsin, Chippewa, and St. Croix river systems, cutting largely Wisconsin white pine. During long winter months, logging crews felled and stacked logs on the frozen rivers. Spring thaws flushed the logs down the streams toward the Mississippi River.

John Lyman Book Award (North American Society for Oceanic History), Honorable Mention
Cover of 'Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994'

Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994
Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America
By Frederick Way Jr.
· Foreword by Joseph W. Rutter

The first Mississippi steamboat was a packet, the New Orleans, a sidewheeler built at Pittsburgh in 1811, designed for the New Orleans-Natchez trade. Packets dominated during the first forty years of steam, providing the quickest passenger transportation throughout mid-continent America. The packets remained fairly numerous even into the first two decades of the twentieth century when old age or calamity overtook them.

Cover of 'To Possess the Land'

To Possess the Land
A Biography of Arthur Rochford Manby
By Frank Waters

Ambitious and only 24 years old, Arthur Manby arrived from England in the Territory of New Mexico in 1883, and saw in its wilderness an empire that he believed himself destined to rule. For his kingdom, he chose a vast Spanish land grant near Taos, a wild 100,000 acres whose ancient title was beyond question. Obsessed, he poured more than 20 years into his dream of glory, and schemed, stole, lied, cajoled, begged, and bribed to take the vast grant from its rightful owners.

Cover of 'George Montague Wheeler'

George Montague Wheeler
The Man and the Myth
By Doris O. Dawdy

Until Dawdy's “The Wyant Diary” appeared in Arizona and the West in 1980, it was virtually unknown that Lt. Wheeler was the leader of the government exploring party from which artist A. H. Wyant returned with a paralyzed arm. So little used were government reports prior to the mid-twentieth century that not one of the writers and compilers of information about this prominent artist, known to have been with a military expedition, had looked at the most likely report, that of Lt.

Cover of 'Suicide or Murder?'

Suicide or Murder?
The Strange Death of Governor Meriwether Lewis
By Vardis Fisher

The death of Meriwether Lewis is one of the great mysteries of American history. Was he murdered at Grinder’s Stand or did he commit suicide? Vardis Fisher meticulously reconstructs the events and presents his own version of the case with the precision and persuasiveness of a fine trial lawyer. But Fisher was also a great novelist and it is his sense of character that serves him best here.

Cover of 'Weather Pioneers'

Weather Pioneers
The Signal Corps Station at Pikes Peak
By Phyllis Smith

At 14,110 feet, the weather station atop Pikes Peak, Colorado, was the highest in the world in 1873. Young men trained by the Signal Corps took turns living year-round on the isolated mountain, where they endured loneliness, primitive living conditions, lack of financial support and appreciation, and deteriorating health. Most did so with dedication and good humor.

Cover of 'Timberline Tailings'

Timberline Tailings
Tales of Colorado’s Ghost Towns and Mining Camps
By Muriel Sibell Wolle

Cover of 'Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850'

Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850
By Donald A. Hutslar

Log construction entered the Ohio territory with the seventeenth-century fur traders and mid-eighteenth-century squatters and then spread throughout most of the area after the opening of the territory in the 1780s. Scottish-Irish and German settlers, using techniques from the eastern states and European homelands, found the abundant timber resources of the Ohio country ideally suited to this simple, durable form of construction.

Cover of 'Goldfield'

Goldfield
The Last Gold Rush on The Western Frontier
By Sally Zanjani

“The discovery of Goldfield, Nevada, in 1902, along with the earlier discovery of Tonopah in 1900, marked the revival of mining in Nevada. Mining production, which had escalated after the discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1859, dropped to almost nothing with the decline of the Comstock in the 1870s. Without continued mining production, the state entered what proved to be a twenty-year depression period that ultimately led some observers to suggest that Nevada be deprived of its statehood.

Cover of 'An African American in South Africa'

An African American in South Africa
The Travel Notes of Ralph J. Bunche 28 September 1937–1 January 1938
By Ralph Bunche
· Edited by Robert R. Edgar

Ralph Bunche, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950, traveled to South Africa for three months in 1937. His notes, which have been skillfully compiled and annotated by historian Robert R. Edgar, provide unique insights on a segregated society.