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Criminology

Criminology Book List

Cover of 'Under the Heel of the Dragon'

Under the Heel of the Dragon
Islam, Racism, Crime, and the Uighur in China
By Blaine Kaltman

The Turkic Muslims known as the Uighur have long faced social and economic disadvantages in China because of their minority status.

Violence in Society · Race and Ethnicity · Sociology of Religion · Religion, Politics, and the State · Islam · China · Central Asia · Xinjiang · Criminology · Asian Studies

Cover of 'The Unpast'

The Unpast
Elite Violence and Social Control in Brazil, 1954–2000
By R. S. Rose

Portuguese and Brazilian slave-traders shipped at least four million slaves to Brazil—in contrast to the five hundred thousand slaves that English vessels brought to the Americas. Controlling the vast number of slaves in Brazil became of primary importance. The Unpast: Elite Violence and Social Control in Brazil, 1954–2000 documents the ways in which the brutal methods used on plantations led directly to the phenomenon of Brazilian death squads.

History · Violence in Society · Criminology · 21st century · 20th century · Americas · South America · Brazil · International Studies · Latin American History · Global Issues · International History · Latin American Studies

Cover of 'African Underclass'

African Underclass
Urbanisation, Crime, and Colonial Order in Dar es Salaam
By Andrew Burton

African Underclass examines the social, political, and administrative repercussions of rapid urban growth in Dar es Salaam. The origins of an often coercive response to urbanization in postcolonial Tanzania are traced back to the colonial period. The British reacted to unanticipated urban growth by attempting to limit the process, though this failed to prevent a substantial increase in rates of urbanization.

African Studies · African History · Political Science · History · Tanzania · Eastern Africa · Africa · Violence in Society · Criminology

Cover of 'We Are Fighting the World'

We Are Fighting the World
A History of the Marashea Gangs in South Africa, 1947–1999
By Gary Kynoch

Since the late 1940s, a violent African criminal society known as the Marashea has operated in and around South Africa’s gold mining areas. With thousands of members involved in drug smuggling, extortion, and kidnapping, the Marashea was more influential in the day-to-day lives of many black South Africans under apartheid than were agents of the state. These gangs remain active in South Africa.

African History · Social History · 20th century · Violence in Society · South Africa · African Studies · Criminology · Global Issues

Cover of 'Faces in the Revolution'

Faces in the Revolution
The Psychological Effects of Violence on Township Youth in South Africa
By Gill Straker

One of South Africa’s most serious problems is the large number of youths in the black townships who have been exposed to an incredible depth and complexity of trauma. Not only have they lived through severe poverty, the deterioration of family and social structures, and an inferior education system, but they have also been involved in catastrophic levels of violence, both as victims and as perpetrators. What are the effects of the milieu? What future is there for this generation?

African Studies · Africa · Southern Africa · South Africa · 20th century · Criminology · History · African History · Sociology · Psychology · Violence in Society

Cover of 'Khaki and Blue'

Khaki and Blue
Military and Police in British Colonial Africa
By Anthony Clayton and David Killingray

Drawing upon a survey of former police officers in the six British colonies of Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, and Malawi, Clayton and Killingray examine the work of colonial law enforcement during the last years of British supremacy. In addition to such basic institutional information as the development of police forces from local militia, the training of African recruits, and the africanization of the police forces, the authors examine the typical activities of the colonial police.

African History · Military History · Colonialism and Decolonization · 20th century · Zambia · Malawi · Uganda · Kenya · Nigeria · Ghana · Criminology · African Studies

Cover of 'Lê Code'

Lê Code
Law in Traditional Vietnam
By Ngọc Huy Nguyễn, Tài Văn Ta, and Binh Tu Tran

The Lê Code: Law in Traditional Vietnam is the first English translation of the penal code produced by Vietnam’s Lê Dynasty (1428-1788). The code itself was the culmination of a long process of political, social and legal development that extended into the period of the succeeding Nguyen Dynasty and, in many respects, into the twentieth century. As is the case with cultures of other countries in East Asia, Vietnam has been widely influenced by China.

Asian Studies · Asia · Eastern Asia · Vietnam · Law · Legal and Constitutional History · Asian History · International History · History · Southeast Asian Studies · Criminology