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Europe

Europe Book List

Cover of 'Every Factory a Fortress'

Every Factory a Fortress
The French Labor Movement in the Age of Ford and Hitler
By Michael Torigian

French trade unions played a historical role in the 1930s quite unlike that of any other labor movement. Against a backdrop of social unrest, parliamentary crisis, and impending world war, industrial unionists in the great metal-fabricating plants of the Paris Region carried out a series of street mobilizations, factory occupations, and general strikes that were virtually unique in Western history.

Cover of 'Midwives of the Revolution'

Midwives of the Revolution
Female Bolsheviks and Women Workers in 1917
By Jane McDermid and Anna Hillyar

The Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917 and the ensuing communist regime have often been portrayed as a man’s revolution, with women as bystanders or even victims. Midwives of the Revolution examines the powerful contribution made by women to the overthrow of tsarism in 1917 and their importance in the formative years of communism in Russia.

Cover of 'Lionel Sotheby’s Great War'

Lionel Sotheby’s Great War
Diaries and Letters from the Western Front
By Lionel Sotheby
· Edited by Donald C. Richter
· Introduction by Donald C. Richter
· Foreword by Peter H. Liddle

The “butterfly” that emerged in World War I trench warfare in 1915 aspired to kill: “I cannot explain,” the diary continues. “It comes unseen and makes you oblivious of almost everything at times, save one intense desire to kill, kill, kill, the Germans.” Lionel Sotheby’s diary and letters are a compelling first-person account of the harrowing experiences of the young British lieutenant at the Western Front. His writing reveals constant peril, hourly discomfort, and gruesome injuries.

Cover of 'The Literary Guide and Companion to Northern England'

The Literary Guide and Companion to Northern England
By Robert M. Cooper

The Literary Guide and Companion to Northern England is the third and final guide in Cooper’s light-hearted and informative travel collection. As Cooper explains in the preface to the first volume: “This book was written for the person who unabashedly loves travel, loves England, and loves English literature. In short, for somebody remarkably like the person I was when I began to plan my first trip to Britain and looked for just such a book.”

Cover of 'The Literary Guide and Companion to Middle England'

The Literary Guide and Companion to Middle England
By Robert M. Cooper

Cooper’s The Literary Guide and Companion to Southern England has been popular with travellers since 1986. This, the second guide in a series of three, brings all Cooper’s delight and enthusiasm to the literary sites of Middle England.

Cover of 'George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924'

George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924
By Frederick F. Travis

George Kennan’s career as a specialist on Russian affairs began in 1865, with his first journey to the Russian empire. A twenty-year-old telegraphic engineer at the time, he was a member of the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, a now virtually unknown but nevertheless remarkable nineteenth-century adventure story.

Cover of 'Fetter’d or Free?'

Fetter’d or Free?
British Women Novelists, 1670-1815
Edited by Mary A. Schofield and Cecilia Macheski

Traditional literary theory holds that women writers of the Restoration and eighteenth century produced works of limited range and value: simple tales of domestic conflict, seduction, and romance. Bringing a broad range of methodologies (historical, textual, post-structuralist, psychological) to bear on the works of Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Smith, Sarah Fielding, Fanny Burney, Jane Austen, and others. Fetter'd or Free?

Cover of 'The Literary Guide and Companion to Southern England'

The Literary Guide and Companion to Southern England
By Robert M. Cooper

In a series of intriguing routes through the English countryside, Professor Robert Cooper notes those attractions that the casual tourist might unknowingly pass by, such as the house where Dickens wrote A Tale of Two Cities, or the windswept quay where John Fowles's French Lieutenant's woman walked.