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European History

European History Book List

Cover of 'Soldiers of Misfortune'

Soldiers of Misfortune
lvoirien Tirailleurs of World War II
By Nancy Ellen Lawler

This is a study of the African veterans of a European war. It is a story of men from the Cote d'Ivoire, many of whom had seldom traveled more than a few miles from their villages, who served France as tirailleurs (riflemen) during World War II. Thousands of them took part in the doomed attempt to hold back the armies of the Third Relch in 1940; many were to spend the rest of the war as prisoners in Germany or Occupied France.

Cover of 'Bazhanov and the Damnation of Stalin'

Bazhanov and the Damnation of Stalin
By Boris Bazhanov
· Translation by David W. Doyle

On January 1, 1928, Bazhanov escaped from the Soviet Union and became for many years the most important member of a new breed—the Soviet defector. At the age of 28, he had become an invaluable aid to Stalin and the Politburo, and had he stayed in Stalin’s service, Bazhanov might well have enjoyed the same meteoric careers as the man who replaced him when he left, Georgy Malenkov. However, Bazhanov came to despise the unethical and brutal regime he served.

Cover of 'Children’s Literature in Hitler’s Germany'

Children’s Literature in Hitler’s Germany
The Cultural Policy of National Socialism
By Christa Kamenetsky

Professor Kamenetsky examines the changing state of children’s literature and folklore in Germany under the impact of Nazi cultural policy between 1933 and 1945. Beginning with a historical introduction highlighting the trends in literary criticism which proved amenable to Nazi ideology, she traces the effect of censorship upon the school libraries, reading curriculum, and publishing environment.

Cover of 'Art and the Reformation in Germany'

Art and the Reformation in Germany
By Carl C. Christensen

The Reformation had considerable impact upon the world of art in sixteenth-century Germany, but that impact was not everywhere a uniform one. Some early Protestant leaders reacted to what they viewed as the idolatrous misuse of visual imagery in late medieval Catholicism with a demand for total abolition of paintings and figurative sculpture from the churches.