shopping_cart

Submissions

For information about submitting your manuscript for the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize, see Hollis Summers Poetry Prize.

Submitting a Proposal

We request that you not submit your complete manuscript unless an editor has invited you to do so.

Your proposal should include a cover letter that includes a narrative description (2-4 typescript pages) of the proposed book's content and scope and an argument for the book's importance, as a rationale for publishing by the Ohio University Press. Why is this book needed? What will it contribute? How does it compare with other literature on the subject? Who is the audience for this book?

Your proposal should also include:

  1. A table of contents
  2. A sample chapter, or two
  3. The anticipated length of the manuscript
  4. The anticipated date of completion (if still a work-in-progress)
  5. An up-to-date copy of your curriculum vitae

Please send submissions to:

Ricky S. Huard
Acquisitions Editor
Ohio University Press
30 Park Place
Suite 101
Athens OH 45701

Submitting a Manuscript

If an editor has requested a full manuscript for review, we ask that you adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Submit a hard copy of the manuscript. At the review stage, computer disk copy is not required.
  2. Manuscript copy should be double-spaced, on standard 8½" × 11" paper. Margins should be at least 1" on all sides. Dot matrix print is only acceptable if it is near-letter quality. Text should be unjustified (ragged right margin).
  3. Pages should be consecutively numbered and printed on one side only.
  4. A total word and/or character count for the work should be given. All text, including tables, charts, graphs, and illustrations, should be submitted. Text should include a table of contents, preface or introduction, all chapters, notes, bibliography, appendices or supplementary materials, and any other text to be included in the work.
  5. In general, Ohio University Press follows the stylistic guidelines in the Chicago Manual of Style and asks that authors prepare their manuscripts accordingly.
  6. All explanatory notes should be prepared as endnotes and placed at the end of the text. Ohio University Press does not accept footnotes, typed at the bottom of corresponding pages. Endnotes should also be prepared in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.
  7. Please provide full information about the permissions that have been or will have to be procured for quoted material and/or illustrations.

Guidelines and Checklists for the Submission of a Final Manuscript

New Titles

Fire Is Your Water
A Novel
At age twenty, Ada’s reputation as a faith healer defines her in her rural Pennsylvania community. But on the day in 1953 that her family’s barn is consumed by flame, her identity is upended: for the first time, she fears death and doubts God.

The Wolf at Number 4
A Novel
When Desire Mensah, a disgraced school teacher in her thirties, meets Wolfgang “Wolf” Ofori, an eleven-year-old genius, a strange friendship develops between them. Set in 1990s Ghana, The Wolf at Number 4 is a chilling and funny gothic tale that forces us to confront whether the wolves around us are born or made.

The Plot Thickens
Illustrated Victorian Serial Fiction from Dickens to Du Maurier
In the early 1800s, books were largely unillustrated. By the 1830s and 1840s, however, innovations in wood- and steel-engraving techniques changed how Victorian readers consumed and conceptualized fiction. A new type of novel was born, often published in serial form, one that melded text and image as partners in meaning-making.

Civil War Congress and the Creation of Modern America
A Revolution on the Home Front
Drawn from a wide range of historical expertise and approaching the topic from a variety of angles, these essays explore the changes in life at home during the Civil War that led to a revolution in American society and set the stage for the making of modern America.

A Short History of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
In the accessible and concise A Short History of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Terri Ochiagha asks new questions and brings wider attention to unfamiliar but crucial elements of the story, including new insights into questions of canonicity, and into literary, historiographical, and precolonial aesthetic influences.