Andrew Welsh-Huggins is legal affairs reporter with the Associated Press in Columbus, Ohio. He has written extensively on capital punishment, the drug trade, and politics. He is the author of three Andy Hayes mysteries, Fourth Down Out, Slow Burn, and Capitol Punishment.
Photo credit: Emma Welsh-Huggins

Capitol Punishment

An Andy Hayes Mystery

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

All eyes are on swing state Ohio in the midst of a presidential election, and protecting a controversial reporter seems simple enough to Andy. But then a body shows up in the Statehouse.

Slow Burn

An Andy Hayes Mystery

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

Almost two years have passed since Aaron Custer supposedly set a fire at a house in Columbus that killed three college students, when it starts to seem likely that the wrong man is in prison.

Fourth Down and Out

An Andy Hayes Mystery

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

Andy Hayes, everyone’s not-so-favorite former Buckeye quarterback, thinks retrieving a laptop with a damning video should be easy enough—until bodies start to pile up and the case gets personal.

Hatred at Home

al-Qaida on Trial in the American Midwest

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

One day in 2002, three friends — a Somali immigrant, a Pakistan–born U.S. citizen, and a hometown African American — met in a Columbus, Ohio coffee shop and vented over civilian casualties in the war in Afghanistan. Their conversation triggered an investigation that would become one of the most unusual and far–reaching government probes into terrorism since the 9/11 attacks.

No Winners Here Tonight

Race, Politics, and Geography in One of the Country’s Busiest Death Penalty States

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins

Few subjects are as intensely debated in the United States as the death penalty. Some form of capital punishment has existed in America for hundreds of years, yet the justification for carrying out the ultimate sentence is a continuing source of controversy.


Ken Saro-Wiwa
A penetrating, accessible portrait of the activist whose execution galvanized the world.


Nation on Board
Becoming Nigerian at Sea
Schler’s study of Nigerian seamen during Nigeria’s transition to independence provides a fresh perspective on the meaning of decolonization for ordinary Africans.


Culture and Money in the Nineteenth Century
Abstracting Economics
Since the 1980s, scholars have made the case for examining nineteenth-century culture — particularly literary output — through the lens of economics.


Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War
In the decades since the Vietnam War, veteran memoirs have influenced Americans’ understanding of the conflict. Yet few historians or literary scholars have scrutinized how the genre has shaped the nation’s collective memory of the war and its aftermath.


Tales of the Metric System
A Novel
Imraan Coovadia takes his homeland’s transition from imperial to metric measurements as his catalyst, holding South Africa up to the light and examining it from multiple perspectives, his sere, direct sentences lighting a fire as he parses South Africa across the decades, from 1970 into the present.