Denison B. Hull

Denison Bingham Hull is a graduate of Harvard College and the Harvard School of Architecture. He is a trustee of the American Farm School in Thessaloniki, Greece, and has received numerous honors, including the Gold Cross and the Order of the Phoenix from the Greek government. He is the translator of Homer’s Illiad and Homer’s Odyssey, also published by Ohio University Press.

Listed in: European Literature · Literary Studies




Digenis Akritas · The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version
By Denison B. Hull · Translation by Denison B. Hull · Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.

“This work will be welcomed by those who want to enjoy this epic in a clear and enjoyable translation.”

Library Journal




Digenis Akritas · The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version
By Denison B. Hull · Translation by Denison B. Hull · Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.

“This work will be welcomed by those who want to enjoy this epic in a clear and enjoyable translation.”

Library Journal




Digenis Akritas · The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version
By Denison B. Hull · Translation by Denison B. Hull · Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.

“This work will be welcomed by those who want to enjoy this epic in a clear and enjoyable translation.”

Library Journal