Denison Bingham Hull is a graduate of Harvard College and the Harvard School of Architecture. He is a trustee of the American Farm School in Thessaloniki, Greece, and has received numerous honors, including the Gold Cross and the Order of the Phoenix from the Greek government. He is the translator of Homer’s Illiad and Homer’s Odyssey, also published by Ohio University Press.

Digenis Akritas

The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version

By Denison B. Hull
Translation by Denison B. Hull
Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.

Digenis Akritas

The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version

By Denison B. Hull
Translation by Denison B. Hull
Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.

Digenis Akritas

The Two-Blood Border Lord—The Grottaferrata Version

By Denison B. Hull
Translation by Denison B. Hull
Introduction by Denison B. Hull

Among the epic romances of post–Barbarian Europe, such as Roland and El Cid, Digenis Akritas has been the least known in the West—outside Greece. It is the story of a half–breed prince who guarded the eastern border of the Roman Empire of Byzantium on the Euphrates in the tenth century.


The Public and Its Problems
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More than six decades after John Dewey’s death, his political philosophy is undergoing a revival.


Modern Muslims
A Sudan Memoir
Steve Howard departed for the Sudan in the early 1980s as an American graduate student beginning a three-year journey in which he would join and live with the Republican Brotherhood, the Sufi Muslim group led by the visionary Mahmoud Mohamed Taha.


Alexander Robey Shepherd
The Man Who Built the Nation’s Capital
With Alexander Robey Shepherd, John P. Richardson gives us the first full-length biography of his subject, who as Washington, D.C.’s, public works czar (1871–74) built the infrastructure of the nation’s capital in a few frenetic years after the Civil War.


Paying Calls in Shangri-La
Scenes from a Woman’s Life in American Diplomacy
Judith M. Heimann entered the diplomatic life in 1958 to join her husband, John, in Jakarta, Indonesia, at his American Embassy post. This, her first time out of the United States, would set her on a path across the continents as she mastered the fine points of diplomatic culture.


Citizenship, Belonging, and Political Community in Africa
Dialogues between Past and Present
Africa, it is often said, is suffering from a crisis of citizenship. At the heart of the contemporary debates this apparent crisis has provoked lie dynamic relations between the present and the past, between political theory and political practice, and between legal categories and lived experience.