Ohio University Press is the largest university press in Ohio. With more than 1,000 books in print, the Press publishes between 40 and 50 books each year by authors in the United States and around the world. Some of our books have wide appeal as university texts and regional classics, while others make available the results of peer-reviewed and often groundbreaking research in the humanities and social sciences. Many of our most distinguished and attractive books are made possible by support from generous individuals and institutions.

Your gift allows Ohio University Press to:
· publish scholarly works that may not always recover their costs through sales
· make all our books available in a variety of electronic formats
· develop ambitious long-term projects that showcase areas in which Ohio University and the Press are recognized as established or emerging leaders

We welcome inquiries about sponsorship of individual books and series, contributions to our general endowment, and other funding opportunities and partnerships. Contact Gillian Berchowitz, Director, at berchowi@ohio.edu or 740-593-1157 with any inquiries about supporting the Press.

How to Support Ohio University Press


Women in the Shadows
Gender, Puppets, and the Power of Tradition in Bali
Wayang kulit, or shadow puppetry, connects a mythic past to the present through public ritual performance and is one of most important performance traditions in Bali. The dalang, or puppeteer, is revered in Balinese society as a teacher and spiritual leader.


The Public and Its Problems
An Essay in Political Inquiry
More than six decades after John Dewey’s death, his political philosophy is undergoing a revival.


Modern Muslims
A Sudan Memoir
Steve Howard departed for the Sudan in the early 1980s as an American graduate student beginning a three-year journey in which he would join and live with the Republican Brotherhood, the Sufi Muslim group led by the visionary Mahmoud Mohamed Taha.


Alexander Robey Shepherd
The Man Who Built the Nation’s Capital
With Alexander Robey Shepherd, John P. Richardson gives us the first full-length biography of his subject, who as Washington, D.C.’s, public works czar (1871–74) built the infrastructure of the nation’s capital in a few frenetic years after the Civil War.


Paying Calls in Shangri-La
Scenes from a Woman’s Life in American Diplomacy
Judith M. Heimann entered the diplomatic life in 1958 to join her husband, John, in Jakarta, Indonesia, at his American Embassy post. This, her first time out of the United States, would set her on a path across the continents as she mastered the fine points of diplomatic culture.