Ohio University Press is the largest university press in Ohio. With more than 1,000 books in print, the Press publishes between 40 and 50 books each year by authors in the United States and around the world. Some of our books have wide appeal as university texts and regional classics, while others make available the results of peer-reviewed and often groundbreaking research in the humanities and social sciences. Many of our most distinguished and attractive books are made possible by support from generous individuals and institutions.

Your gift allows Ohio University Press to:
· publish scholarly works that may not always recover their costs through sales
· make all our books available in a variety of electronic formats
· develop ambitious long-term projects that showcase areas in which Ohio University and the Press are recognized as established or emerging leaders

We welcome inquiries about sponsorship of individual books and series, contributions to our general endowment, and other funding opportunities and partnerships. Contact Gillian Berchowitz, Director, at berchowi@ohio.edu or 740-593-1157 with any inquiries about supporting the Press.

How to Support Ohio University Press


Athens and Jerusalem
For more than two thousand years, philosophers and theologians have wrestled with the irreconcilable opposition between Greek rationality (Athens) and biblical revelation (Jerusalem).


Paying Calls in Shangri-La
Scenes from a Woman’s Life in American Diplomacy
Judith M. Heimann entered the diplomatic life in 1958 to join her husband, John, in Jakarta, Indonesia, at his American Embassy post. This, her first time out of the United States, would set her on a path across the continents as she mastered the fine points of diplomatic culture.


Citizenship, Belonging, and Political Community in Africa
Dialogues between Past and Present
Africa, it is often said, is suffering from a crisis of citizenship. At the heart of the contemporary debates this apparent crisis has provoked lie dynamic relations between the present and the past, between political theory and political practice, and between legal categories and lived experience.


When Grandma Gatewood Took a Hike
In 1955, sixty-seven-year-old Emma “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to solo hike the entire length of the Appalachian Trail in one through hike. Michelle Houts and Erica Magnus bring us the first children’s book about her feat and the unexpected challenges she encountered on the journey she initially called a “lark.”


Making the Mark
Gender, Identity, and Genital Cutting
Why do female genital cutting practices persist? How does circumcision affect the rights of girls in a culture where initiation forms the lynchpin of the ritual cycle at the core of defining gender, identity, and social and political status?