Ohio University Press is the largest university press in Ohio. With more than 1,000 books in print, the Press publishes between 40 and 50 books each year by authors in the United States and around the world. Some of our books have wide appeal as university texts and regional classics, while others make available the results of peer-reviewed and often groundbreaking research in the humanities and social sciences. Many of our most distinguished and attractive books are made possible by support from generous individuals and institutions.

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New Titles

From Jail to Jail
From Jail to Jail is the political autobiography of a central though enigmatic figure of the Indonesian Revolution.


Living with Nkrumahism
Nation, State, and Pan-Africanism in Ghana
In the 1950s, Ghana, under the leadership of Kwame Nkrumah and the Convention People’s Party, drew the world’s attention as anticolonial activists, intellectuals, and politicians looked to it as a model for Africa’s postcolonial future. Nkrumah was a visionary, a statesman, and one of the key makers of contemporary Africa.


Market Encounters
Consumer Cultures in Twentieth-Century Ghana
By emphasizing the centrality of human relationships to Ghana’s economic past, Murillo introduces a radical rethinking of consumption studies from an Africa-centered perspective. The result is a keen look at colonial capitalism in all of its intricacies, legacies, and contradictions, including its entanglement with gender and race.


Following the Ball
The Migration of African Soccer Players across the Portuguese Colonial Empire, 1949–1975
With Following the Ball, Todd Cleveland incorporates labor, sport, diasporic, and imperial history to examine the extraordinary experiences of African football players from Portugal’s African colonies as they relocated to the metropole from 1949 until the conclusion of the colonial era in 1975.


Making Money
Life, Death, and Early Modern Trade on Africa’s Guinea Coast
A new era in world history began when Atlantic maritime trade among Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas opened up in the fifteenth century, setting the stage for massive economic and cultural change.