Ohio University Press is the largest university press in Ohio. With more than 1,000 books in print, the Press publishes between 40 and 50 books each year by authors in the United States and around the world. Some of our books have wide appeal as university texts and regional classics, while others make available the results of peer-reviewed and often groundbreaking research in the humanities and social sciences. Many of our most distinguished and attractive books are made possible by support from generous individuals and institutions.

Your gift allows Ohio University Press to:
· publish scholarly works that may not always recover their costs through sales
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· develop ambitious long-term projects that showcase areas in which Ohio University and the Press are recognized as established or emerging leaders

We welcome inquiries about sponsorship of individual books and series, contributions to our general endowment, and other funding opportunities and partnerships. Contact Gillian Berchowitz, Director, at berchowi@ohio.edu or 740-593-1157 with any inquiries about supporting the Press.

How to Support Ohio University Press

Jihād in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions
In Jihād in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions, a preeminent historian of Africa argues that scholars of the Americas and the Atlantic world have not given Africa its due consideration as part of either the Atlantic world or the age of revolutions.

Athens and Jerusalem
For more than two thousand years, philosophers and theologians have wrestled with the irreconcilable opposition between Greek rationality (Athens) and biblical revelation (Jerusalem).

African Miracle, African Mirage
Transnational Politics and the Paradox of Modernization in Ivory Coast
Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Ivory Coast was touted as an African miracle, a poster child for modernization and the ways that Western aid and multinational corporations would develop the continent.

South Sudan
A New History for a New Nation
Africa’s newest nation has a long history. Often considered remote and isolated from the rest of Africa, and usually associated with the violence of slavery and civil war, South Sudan has been an arena for a complex mixing of peoples, languages, and beliefs.

The Art of Life in South Africa
From 1952 to 1981, South Africa’s apartheid government ran an art school for the training of African art teachers at Indaleni, in what is today KwaZulu-Natal. The Art of Life in South Africa is the story of the students, teachers, art, and politics that circulated through a small school, housed in a remote former mission station.