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Submissions

For information about submitting your manuscript for the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize, see Hollis Summers Poetry Prize.

Submitting a Proposal

We request that you not submit your complete manuscript unless an editor has invited you to do so.

Your proposal should include a cover letter that includes a narrative description (2-4 typescript pages) of the proposed book's content and scope and an argument for the book's importance, as a rationale for publishing by the Ohio University Press. Why is this book needed? What will it contribute? How does it compare with other literature on the subject? Who is the audience for this book?

Your proposal should also include:

  1. A table of contents
  2. A sample chapter, or two
  3. The anticipated length of the manuscript
  4. The anticipated date of completion (if still a work-in-progress)
  5. An up-to-date copy of your curriculum vitae

Please send submissions to:

Ricky S. Huard
Acquisitions Editor
Ohio University Press
30 Park Place
Suite 101
Athens OH 45701

Submitting a Manuscript

If an editor has requested a full manuscript for review, we ask that you adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Submit a hard copy of the manuscript. At the review stage, computer disk copy is not required.
  2. Manuscript copy should be double-spaced, on standard 8½" × 11" paper. Margins should be at least 1" on all sides. Dot matrix print is only acceptable if it is near-letter quality. Text should be unjustified (ragged right margin).
  3. Pages should be consecutively numbered and printed on one side only.
  4. A total word and/or character count for the work should be given. All text, including tables, charts, graphs, and illustrations, should be submitted. Text should include a table of contents, preface or introduction, all chapters, notes, bibliography, appendices or supplementary materials, and any other text to be included in the work.
  5. In general, Ohio University Press follows the stylistic guidelines in the Chicago Manual of Style and asks that authors prepare their manuscripts accordingly.
  6. All explanatory notes should be prepared as endnotes and placed at the end of the text. Ohio University Press does not accept footnotes, typed at the bottom of corresponding pages. Endnotes should also be prepared in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.
  7. Please provide full information about the permissions that have been or will have to be procured for quoted material and/or illustrations.

Guidelines and Checklists for the Submission of a Final Manuscript

New Titles

Spirituality and the Writer
A Personal Inquiry
Today, the surprisingly elastic form of the memoir embraces subjects that include dying, illness, loss, relationships, and self-awareness. Writing to reveal the inner self—the pilgrimage into one’s spiritual and/or religious nature—is a primary calling.

Intrusive Beauty
Poems
In this powerful debut, Capista traverses earth and ether to yield poems that elucidate the space between one’s life and one’s livelihood. While its landscapes range from back-alley Baltimore to the Bitterroot Valley, this book remains close to unbidden beauty and its capacity to sway one’s vision of the world.

Beep
Inside the Unseen World of Baseball for the Blind
In Beep, David Wanczyk illuminates the sport of blind baseball to show us a remarkable version of America’s pastime. With balls tricked out to squeal three times per second, and with bases that buzz, this game of baseball for the blind is both innovative and intense.

Technologies of Suspicion and the Ethics of Obligation in Political Asylum
Taking everyday practices and interactions as their focus, contributors draw on various theoretical perspectives to examine how tensions between humanitarianism and security are negotiated at the local level. They thus show how asylum seekers are produced as suspicious subjects by the very systems to which they appeal for protection.

Writing the Polish American Woman in Postwar Ethnic Fiction
Though often unnoticed by scholars of literature and history, Polish American women have for decades been fighting back against the patriarchy they encountered in America and the patriarchy that followed them from Poland.